2013 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2013 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2014 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2012 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2012 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2011 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2011 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2010 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2010 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2009 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2009 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2005 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2006 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2007 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

2008 New Discoveries and Honors in Cancer Research

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

Members of the Damon Runyon scientific circle regularly publish findings on the latest cancer research and are frequently recognized for their contributions to the fight against cancer.  Below, you will find new discoveries in cancer research and the most recent honors bestowed upon Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awardees, alumni and friends.

Damon Runyon Foundation Grants Prestigious Fellowship Awards to 16 Top Young Scientists

Grants totaling over $3.3M give early career investigators independence to pursue novel ideas


New York, NY (July 14, 2014) – The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named 16 new Damon Runyon Fellows at its spring Fellowship Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious, four-year award are outstanding postdoctoral scientists conducting basic and translational cancer research in the laboratories of leading senior investigators across the country. The Fellowship encourages the nation's most promising young scientists to pursue careers in cancer research by providing them with independent funding ($208,000 each for basic scientists, $248,000 for physician-scientists) to work on innovative projects.

May 2014 Damon Runyon Fellows:

Caitlin A. Brennan, PhD [Dennis and Marsha Dammerman Fellow], with her sponsor Wendy S. Garrett, MD, PhD, at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, studies colorectal cancer and its connection to the human microbiota- the collection of bacteria and other microbes associated with the body in both healthy and disease states. Her research will investigate how specific bacteria signal to both the immune system and other microbes in the development of colorectal cancer.
Dennis L. Buckley, PhD [Merck Fellow],
with his sponsor James E. Bradner, MD, at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, aims to develop improved inhibitors of BET-bromodomain proteins for treatment of multiple cancers, such as NUT-midline carcinoma, acute leukemia, hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In addition, he will evaluate both novel and existing BET inhibitors in neuroblastoma. His goal is to chemically generate drugs with improved efficacy or lower side effects.
Casey A. Gifford, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with her sponsor Deepak Srivastava, MD, at the Gladstone Institutes, San Francisco, aims to define the roles for DNA-binding proteins that can manipulate DNA conformation in the nucleus. DNA is maintained in an ordered conformation that contributes to control of gene expression and cellular identity. She will employ next-generation sequencing approaches and human stem cells to better understand why the loss or aberrant expression of these DNA-binding proteins leads to cancer.
Keren I. Hilgendorf, PhD [Layton Family Fellow],
with her sponsor Peter K. Jackson, PhD, at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, is exploring the role of primary cilia in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. The primary cilium is an antenna-like cellular protrusion that is localized on the surface of most vertebrate cells and functions in chemo- and mechanosensation. In many cancers, primary cilia are lost, so cilia-mediated signaling pathways are deregulated.
Fuguo Jiang, PhD [Merck Fellow],
with his sponsor Jennifer A. Doudna, PhD, at the University of California, Berkeley, is studying the CRISPR-Cas system, which has been adopted as a robust and versatile platform for genome engineering in human cells as well as other experimental systems. He aims to use a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches to investigate the detailed molecular mechanism of RNA-guided DNA targeting and recognition by CRISPR-Cas9. The results of this research will provide a fundamental understanding of the Cas9 enzyme family and will support its use for gene therapies against cancers.
Avinash Khanna, PhD [Rebecca Ridley Kry Fellow],
with his sponsor Matthew D. Shair, PhD, at Harvard University, Cambridge, studies a type of leukemia called mixed lineage leukemia (MLL), which often results in early relapse and a poor prognosis for the patient. Recently, it was found that inhibition of a protein called Mediator diminishes the ability of AML cancer cells to grow and proliferate. This research will use small molecules to elucidate the chemical biology of Mediator proteins.
Yin Liu, PhD [Layton Family Fellow],
with her sponsor Mark A. Krasnow, MD, PhD, at Stanford University, Stanford, studies lung biology. The lung is innervated by diverse types of sensory neurons, collectively called pulmonary sensory neurons. These neurons detect a variety of physiological stimuli from the lung and inform the central nervous system about the state of the lung. Lung cancer, one of the most common cancers with a high rate of lethality, is associated with symptoms such as chronic cough, shortness of breath, and referred cranial facial pain. Her research will examine how pulmonary sensory neurons recognize and respond to lung tumors and mediate lung cancer-associated clinical symptoms.
Chao Lu, PhD [Kandarian Family Fellow],
with his sponsor C. David Allis, PhD, at The Rockefeller University, New York, is studying histones, proteins that fold DNA into high-order structures, which is critical for proper gene expression. Mutations in histones are mutated in certain types of pediatric brain tumors and sarcomas, including a rare bone cancer called chondroblastoma. He aims to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which histone proteins function and how they are perturbed in tumor cells.
Timothy D. Martin, PhD [Marion Abbe Fellow],
with his sponsor Stephen J. Elledge, PhD, at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, focuses on genomic instability, a hallmark of virtually all cancers that underlies the mutations and aneuploidy (incorrect chromosome number) changes that perturb oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Patient tumor sequencing has unveiled common genomic alterations across different cancers. The goal of this project is to precisely recreate these genomic alterations and directly test how each contributes to oncogenesis.
Mandy M. Muller, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with her sponsor Britt Glaunsinger, PhD, at the University of California, Berkeley, is examining Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a virus associated with lifelong infections. A healthy immune system keeps the virus in check; however, in immunocompromised individuals, KSHV is associated with a number of malignances, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). KSHV dramatically manipulates the intracellular gene expression environment of its host cell. The defining characteristic is a near-global depletion of cytoplasmic mRNA called "host shutoff." The goal of this research is to mechanistically delineate how the virus hijacks host factors to dampen gene expression in the cell.
Duy P. Nguyen, PhD [Connie and Bob Lurie Fellow],
with his sponsor James A. Wells, PhD, at the University of California, San Francisco, is analyzing the bacterial enzyme Cas9, which has emerged to be a versatile tool to manipulate the genome. He aims to develop an efficient method for selective delivery to and activation of Cas9 in cancer cells. The developed methodology will hopefully set the foundation for rapidly creating genetic models to interrogate signaling pathways implicated in cancer and to investigate novel drug screening approaches that identify new drug targets for cancer treatment.
Neel H. Shah, PhD,
with his sponsor John Kuriyan, PhD, at the University of California, Berkeley, aims to elucidate structural details of the signaling enzyme ZAP-70, found primarily in immune T cells. Expression of ZAP-70 in other immune cells, B cells, however, is associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Furthermore, loss of ZAP-70 function causes severe combined immunodeficiency; an impaired immune system can increase a patient's susceptibility to tumor development. His research on ZAP-70 structure and function will help lay the groundwork for the development of ZAP-70-specific therapeutics.
Hume Akahori Stroud, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with his sponsor Michael E. Greenberg, PhD, at Harvard Medical School, Boston, is examining the distinct role of MeCP2, a protein that binds methyl-CpG-DNA and regulates neuronal chromatin, which "packages" DNA. The proposed research has significant implications for causes and mechanisms of cancer, as dysregulation of DNA methylation and other chromatin modifications represent early oncogenic events in a wide range of human cancers.
Tony Yu-Chen Tsai, PhD, MD [Kenneth G. and Elaine A. Langone Fellow],
with his sponsor Sean G. Megason, PhD, at Harvard Medical School, Boston, seeks to understand how the signaling pathway directed by the protein Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates cell-cell adhesion molecules required for correct spatial organization of the neuro-epithelium. Abnormal Shh signaling is associated with several types of cancer, and aberrant regulation of cell-cell adhesion could lead to tumor metastasis. His findings may ultimately lead to understanding and prevention of metastasis in Shh-associated cancers.
Daniel E. Webster, PhD,
with his sponsor Louis M. Staudt, MD, PhD, at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, studies Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), an aggressive cancer that hijacks the normal molecular mechanisms acting in immune B cells to drive malignant growth. Many genes have been studied as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in DLBCL, but a class of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) remains largely unexplored for its function in this cancer. LncRNAs, once thought to be non-functional products of junk DNA, are now known to play an essential role in many biological processes. This research will discover oncogenic or tumor suppressive lncRNAs in DLBCL to uncover potential targets for cancer diagnosis or therapy.
Sungwook Woo, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with his sponsor Peng Yin, PhD, at Harvard University, Cambridge, is using protein structures to illustrate the mechanisms of cancer-related processes. His research aims to overcome limitations of current techniques by using recent breakthroughs in "programmable DNA self-assembly" to develop protein framework structures. If successful, his efforts will provide a general tool for structural biology and in turn benefit the mechanistic studies and therapeutic development for cancer.

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DAMON RUNYON CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

To accelerate breakthroughs, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides today's best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research. The Foundation has gained worldwide prominence in cancer research by identifying outstanding researchers and physician-scientists. Twelve scientists supported by the Foundation have received the Nobel Prize, and others are heads of cancer centers and leaders of renowned research programs. Each of its award programs is extremely competitive, with less than 10% of applications funded. Since its founding in 1946, Damon Runyon has invested nearly $275 million and funded more than 3,420 young scientists. This year, it will commit over $16 million in new awards to brilliant young investigators.

100% of all donations to the Foundation are used to support scientific research.  Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from its Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets Service and endowment.

For more information visit www.damonrunyon.org

CONTACT
Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org
212.455.0521

 

July 9, 2014 > Comprehensive genomic analysis of lung cancer completed

Matthew L. Meyerson, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘95-‘98) of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute, Cambridge, led a recent study by the NIH Cancer Genome Atlas project, which represents the most comprehensive genomic analysis of lung adenocarcinoma, a cancer that forms in the tissues near the outer parts of the lungs. Researchers identified 18 key mutations in an analysis of 230 patient lung tumors. This identified new potential drug targets and may also help physicians to determine which existing cancer treatments could be most effective in treating each individual patient. This study was published in the journal Nature.

Click here for more.

June 26, 2014 > New genetic tests recommended in patients with ALCL non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Andrew L. Feldman, MD (Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator ‘09-‘14), and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, reported that novel genetic tests can be used to determine the best treatment options for patients with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL), a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There are three subgroups of ALCL that have very different survival rates. These subgroups could not be differentiated by routine pathology but only with the aid of the genetic tests, which the researchers recommend giving to all patients with ALK-negative ALCL. Each patient’s treatment should then be tailored based on the subgroup of his/her disease. The study was published in the journal Blood.

Click here to read more and to view a video of Dr. Feldman. 

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Awards over $4M to 10 Top Young Clinical Investigators

Public release date: 23-June-2014

New York, NY (June 23, 2014)  - The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation named seven new Damon Runyon Clinical Investigators at its spring 2014 Clinical Investigator Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious three-year award are outstanding early career physician-scientists conducting patient-oriented cancer research at major research centers under the mentorship of the nation’s leading scientists and clinicians. Each will receive $450,000 to support the development of his/her cancer research program.

The Foundation also awarded Continuation Grants to three Damon Runyon Clinical Investigators. Each award will provide an additional two years of funding totaling $300,000. The Continuation Grant is designed to support Clinical Investigators who are approaching the end of their original awards and need extra time and funding to complete a promising avenue of research or initiate/continue a clinical trial. This program is possible through the generous support of the William K. Bowes, Jr. Foundation, and Connie and Robert Lurie.

The Clinical Investigator Award program is specifically intended to help address the shortage of physicians capable of translating scientific discovery into new breakthroughs for cancer patients. In partnerships with industry sponsors and through its new Accelerating Cancer Cures initiative, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has committed nearly $49 million to support the careers of 77 physician-scientists across the United States since 2000.

2014 Clinical Investigator Awardees

Arash Ash Alizadeh, MD, PhD
Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common aggressive lymphoma in adults. Unfortunately, current therapies typically fail in nearly half of these patients. Dr. Alizadeh proposes a novel treatment strategy for this disease: to characterize and isolate premalignant stem cells before they transform into cancer cells. He has found that expression of a single oncogene called BCL6 is capable of reprogramming these cells from normal cells to aggressive malignant cells. He aims to define the specific genetic alterations that can give rise to this cell reprogramming. This research will be important both for understanding cancer biology, as well as for developing more effective means for treatment of lymphoma patients.

Dr. Alizadeh works under the mentorship of Ronald Levy, MD, at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

Joshua Brody, MD
Dr. Brody aims to develop a novel treatment approach for patients with advanced-stage lymphoma, by which the patient’s immune system is trained to recognize and eliminate his/her own cancer. This approach, an “in situ vaccine,” recruits and activates specific immune cells, dendritic cells (DC), at the location of the treated tumor—where they can then educate the rest of the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumors throughout the body. The first patients enrolled on this clinical trial have already shown the recruitment and activation of DC within the treated tumor as well as regressions of lymphoma at sites distant from the treated site. The in situ vaccine will initially be tested in patients with low-grade lymphoma, with the goal of quickly expanding to other tumor types including melanoma and head and neck cancer.

Dr. Brody works under the mentorship of Nina Bhardwaj, MD, PhD, and Miriam Merad, MD, PhD, at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York.

Lihua Elizabeth Budde, MD, PhD [The Jake Wetchler Foundation for Innovative Pediatric Cancer Research Clinical Investigator]
Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is the preferred and only curative treatment for most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, a significant percentage of patients will eventually relapse. A novel effective therapy option is therefore urgently needed. Dr. Budde is testing a new strategy that uses patients’ own immune T cells, which have been modified to specifically target and kill leukemia cells. She will direct a Phase 1 clinical trial using these modified immune T cells as therapeutics for patients with AML. She is also developing ways to enhance the potency of these modified immune cells in killing leukemia cells. This therapeutic approach has the potential to change the treatment paradigm and may significantly improve the cure rate for patients with leukemia.

Dr. Budde works under the mentorship of Stephen J. Forman, MD, FACP, at City of Hope, Duarte, California.

Alejandro Gutierrez, MD
It remains unclear why some patients’ tumors can be cured with chemotherapy, whereas other tumors that appear to be nearly identical are completely chemoresistant. Dr. Gutierrez focuses on this issue in a particularly high-risk subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a disease that most commonly affects older children and young adults. His goals are to define the molecular basis of resistance to conventional chemotherapy in patients with this disease, and to leverage this knowledge to develop a therapeutic strategy to restore chemosensitivity. Ultimately, this could lead to significant improvements in clinical outcome for these patients.

Dr. Gutierrez works under the mentorship of Stuart H. Orkin, MD, and Anthony Letai, MD, PhD, at Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Peter S. Hammerman, MD, PhD
Despite the initial success of targeted therapies for cancer, these treatments have limited efficacy in most diseases. Recent studies have shown that the immune cells that infiltrate a tumor play an active role in dictating the response to therapy; specific new therapies can augment the ability of the immune system to fight a cancer in combination with conventional therapies. Dr. Hammerman is using lung cancer as a model to explore genome-scale approaches to dissect this complex relationship between the tumor and its immune microenvironment. The goal of this research is to better define the optimal types of therapy for lung cancer by combining drugs that target the genetic alterations found in the tumor with those aimed at enhancing the immune response to the cancer, and to translate these findings into clinical practice.

Dr. Hammerman works under the mentorship of Glenn Dranoff, MD, Stephen F. Hodi, MD, and Kwok-Kin Wong, MD, PhD, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Luc G. Morris, MD
Head and neck cancer is a lethal malignancy that can arise in the mouth, throat, voice box, and related areas. These tumors are squamous cell cancers that are, in many cases, caused by tobacco use or human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Head and neck cancers have many molecular similarities with squamous cell cancers of the lung and esophagus. Dr. Morris is studying several poorly-understood genes that have been recently observed to be frequently altered in head and neck cancer (as well as lung and esophageal cancer). He has found that several of these genes act as tumor suppressor genes and in their normal state, prevent tumor development. In this project, he will determine the effects of these various gene alterations on tumor growth, cancer cell survival, and the clinical prognosis of patients. This work will help to develop new ways of therapeutically targeting the pathways that promote the development of head and neck and other tobacco and HPV-associated squamous cell cancers.

Dr. Morris works under the mentorship of Timothy Chan, MD, PhD, and James A. Fagin, MD, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Stephen T. Oh, MD, PhD [Doris Duke-Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator]
Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of blood cancers in which a malignant cell population proliferates out of control. Myelofibrosis (MF) is one type of MPN in which the bone marrow becomes replaced by scar tissue, leading to progressive failure of normal blood cell functions and ultimately death, on average five years after initial diagnosis. MPNs, including MF, can evolve to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), which is almost invariably fatal. There is no reliable curative treatment currently available for MPNs or MF. Targeted inhibitors of a protein called JAK2 provide significant symptomatic benefit for MF patients. However, these treatments do not cure the disease, nor has it been shown that they can prevent or delay progression to sAML. Dr. Oh aims to investigate the cellular abnormalities that underlie these blood cancers. These studies have the potential to lead to the development of improved treatments for MPNs.

Dr. Oh works under the mentorship of Daniel Link, MD, at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.

 

2014 Clinical Investigator Continuation Grants


Marie Bleakley, MD [Richard Lumsden Foundation Investigator]

Bone marrow transplantation, or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT), is the only curative therapy for many patients with leukemia. Certain immune cells, called T cells, contained in the donor HCT graft can cause a “graft versus leukemia” (GVL) effect which eliminates leukemic cells. Unfortunately, there are also donor T cells in the HCT graft that can cause a condition called “graft versus host disease” (GVHD). GVHD is a life-threatening immune response that remains the major barrier to the success of transplantation. Dr. Bleakley is developing new approaches to separate the beneficial GVL effect from detrimental GVHD after bone marrow transplantation. She has identified specific subsets of immune cells that promote GVHD; these cells can then be eliminated to reduce the frequency or severity of GVHD, while at the same time maintaining and improving the GVL effect. The Continuation Grant will be used to move this study to the clinical trial phase.

Dr. Bleakley works under the mentorship of Stanley R. Riddell, MD, at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.

Zsofia K. Stadler, MD
Dr. Stadler is a clinical geneticist whose research goal is to determine the genetic basis of “sporadic” cancers in young adults. She is testing the hypothesis that de novo (spontaneous) chromosomal changes in the genome are associated with testicular germline cancer. The Continuation Grant will be used to apply high-resolution sequencing technology to compare the whole genomes of patients to those of their parents, with the goal of identifying rare genetic variants associated with cancer susceptibility and risk. This approach represents a new paradigm in cancer genetics, which could have broad applications in terms of cancer risk stratification and cancer prevention.

Dr. Stadler works under the mentorship of Kenneth Offit, MD, MPH, and Michael H. Wigler, PhD, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Jean Y. Tang, MD, PhD
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer. Mutations in the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway are frequently found in these cancers. Early-stage clinical studies of a HH pathway inhibitor drug have been successful, with 55% of patients reported to respond. However, most tumors develop drug resistance during the course of therapy. Dr. Tang has characterized mechanisms of drug resistance and is working to identify new drug combinations that are effective in treatment of BCC. The Continuation Grant will enable her to move her findings on resistance to clinical trials in patients. Her studies have the potential to benefit patients with BCC as well as those with other HH-dependent cancers, such as medulloblastoma.

Dr. Tang works under the mentorship of Philip A. Beachy, PhD, and Ervin H. Epstein, MD, at Stanford University, Stanford, California.

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DAMON RUNYON CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

 

To accelerate breakthroughs, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides today’s best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research. The Foundation has gained worldwide prominence in cancer research by identifying outstanding researchers and physician-scientists. Twelve scientists supported by the Foundation have received the Nobel Prize, seven others have received National Medals of Science, and 65 have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Since its founding in 1946, Damon Runyon has invested nearly $275 million and funded more than 3,420 young scientists.

100% of all donations to the Foundation are used to support cutting-edge scientific research. Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from its Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets and endowment.

For more information visit www.damonrunyon.org.


CONTACT
Yung S. Lie, PhD
Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org
212.455.0521

Damon Runyon, Sohn Conference Foundations Name 3 New Pediatric Cancer Research Fellows

New York, Memphis, Boston scientists receive prestigious awards to tackle cancers in children and young adults

New York, NY (June 20, 2014) – The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named three outstanding young scientists as recipients of the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award, committing nearly $625,000 to help address a critical shortage of funding for pediatric cancer research.

The Fellowship Award provides funding to basic scientists and clinicians who conduct research with the potential to significantly impact the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of one or more pediatric cancers. Each recipient receives a four-year award ($248,000 for physician-scientists, $208,000 for basic scientists). Since 2012, this award has supported ten innovative pediatric cancer researchers.

The Sohn Conference Foundation, dedicated to curing pediatric cancers, announced in 2012 that it was granting $1.5 million to the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the leading charity supporting innovative young cancer researchers, to establish the award. With the generous support of the Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance, the Fellowship Award continues to receive funding and recognition within the philanthropic community. 

2014 Damon Runyon-Sohn Fellows

Ly P. Vu, PhD, with her sponsors Michael Kharas, PhD, and Ross L. Levine, MD, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, is studying childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Despite exciting advances in our understanding of AML and the availability of more aggressive treatment regimens, approximately 30% of children still eventually relapse from this disease. There are yet no approved targeted therapies for children with AML. Her project aims to uncover the role of Syncrip, a novel RNA binding protein, in maintaining the leukemia stem cell in AML. The study will provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the cause and development of AML and may lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved clinical outcomes for this deadly childhood disease.

David W. Woessner, PhD, with his sponsor Charles G. Mullighan, MBBS, MD, at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, seeks to identify genetic changes that cause the most common type of childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). There are multiple subtypes of ALL, each with distinct genetic changes that drive disease development and influence success or failure of treatment. He has sequenced the genomes of over 1000 tumor cells from children with ALL and identified several hundred repeatedly mutated genes, for which the functions are currently unknown. He will test the role of these changes in ALL. A better understanding of which genetic changes significantly impact cancer behavior in ALL will provide new targets for existing therapy and/or avenues for development of new drug treatments for children with ALL.

Mark W. Zimmerman, PhD, with his sponsor A. Thomas Look, MD, at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, studies neuroblastoma, a type of brain tumor that remains a challenging and often devastating condition despite many recent advances in its clinical management. In high-risk neuroblastoma tumors, which account for 15% of all childhood cancer deaths, the CHD5 gene is often deleted and its loss is associated with poor prognosis. CHD5 has emerged as a very attractive target for potential anti-cancer therapeutics. His research elucidating the CHD5 pathway will lead to significant advances in our understanding of how CHD5 functions as a tumor suppressor and the potential ways it could be targeted for anti-cancer therapy.

 

"These are some of the best young scientists working in pediatric research today, and they're at a critical juncture in their careers," says William Carroll, MD, chair of the Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Committee and Director of the New York University Cancer Institute. "They need our financial support, and we need their brilliant minds focused on curing childhood cancers. That is why this award is so important."

Because cancer occurs less frequently in children and young adults than in the adult population, it does not receive significant funding from either the National Cancer Institute (only four percent of its budget) or the biopharmaceutical industry. As a result, there have been limited advances in recent years in treating these cancers, and fewer scientists are working in this field.

"I am inspired by Damon Runyon's dedication to supporting excellent young scientists who are dedicating themselves to cancer research," says Evan Sohn of the Sohn Conference Foundation. "Our Foundation is investing in this unique fellowship because it has the potential to change how cancer care is provided to children and young adults." 

About The Sohn Conference Foundation

The Foundation was established in memory of Ira Sohn, a Wall Street professional whose life was cut short when he passed away from cancer. For more than fifteen years, the Foundation has raised funds for pediatric cancer research through its highly respected annual investment conference, the Sohn Investment Conference, which features many of Wall Street's best and most successful investors. Thanks to the dedication of the conference founders, esteemed speakers, volunteers, and generous donors, the Foundation has invested more than $20 million in innovative research and institutions at the forefront of cancer research and pediatric care.

About the Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance

The Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance was formed in October 2013 by The Pershing Square Foundation and The Sohn Conference Foundation and is dedicated to playing a catalytic role in accelerating cures for cancer by enabling the pursuit of the most innovative and advanced cancer research and by facilitating partnerships between science and business.

About the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

To accelerate breakthroughs, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides today's best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research. Twelve scientists supported by the Foundation have received the Nobel Prize, seven have received National Medals of Science, and 65 have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the science "Hall of Fame."

Since its founding in 1946, Damon Runyon has invested nearly $275 million and funded more than 3,420 young scientists. 100% of all donations to the Foundation are used to support cutting-edge scientific research. Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets and its endowment.

For more information, visit http://www.damonrunyon.org.

CONTACT
Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org
212.455.0521

Jeremy Robinson-Leon
Media Contact
The Sohn Conference Foundation
jrobinsonleon@groupgordon.com
212.784.5702

James Frayne
Media Contact
Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance
jfrayne@rubenstein.com
212.843.8591 

2014 Annual Breakfast Honoring Steven Kandarian Raises $1.6 Million

New York, NY (June 5, 2014) The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation honored Steven A. Kandarian, CEO of MetLife and Damon Runyon Board of Directors member, at its 2014 Annual Breakfast, held on Tuesday morning at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City. The Breakfast raised more than $1.6 million to support the nation’s most brilliant young cancer researchers, pursuing work that promises to accelerate cures.

Alan M. Leventhal, Chairman of the Damon Runyon Board, welcomed guests to a program that included research updates from Himisha Beltran, MD, a Damon Runyon -Gordon Family Clinical Investigator at Weill Cornell Medical College pursuing personalized treatments for drug-resistant prostate cancer, and Adam de la Zerda, PhD, a Damon Runyon-Dale F. Frey Scientist at Stanford University working on improved imaging techniques to detect and destroy individual cancer cells.

The event’s keynote speaker was James E. Rothman, PhD, recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for work he began as a Damon Runyon Fellow from 1976 to 1978. Dr. Rothman reflected on how the early days of his career set a course for later success, noting "Damon Runyon was there for me when I wanted to take risks…I was trying to take on a major problem most people felt couldn’t be addressed."

Dr. Rothman went on to praise the Foundation’s approach to cancer research, saying "By illuminating a broader swath of biology, researchers can have an unexpected impact. Some of the biggest discoveries are made this way."

The morning’s honoree, Steven A. Kandarian, was introduced by Bruce E. Mosler, CEO of Cushman & Wakefield and Kandarian’s longtime friend. Damon Runyon Board of Directors member Sanford W. Morhouse, Esq. announced that Chao Lu, PhD, would be named the first Damon Runyon-Kandarian Family Fellow in recognition of Kandarian’s numerous contributions to Damon Runyon’s mission.

The Breakfast concluded with remarks from Kandarian, who spoke about cancer’s impact on his own family and his motivations for joining the Damon Runyon Board. “I was stunned by the swift and terrible power of cancer,” Kandarian said of the disease’s impact on his own family. “I can think of no better target for the intellectual energies of our most creative young researchers than this disease.”

DAMON RUNYON CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

To accelerate breakthroughs, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides today’s best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research. The Foundation has gained worldwide prominence in cancer research by identifying outstanding researchers and physician-scientists. Twelve scientists supported by the Foundation have received the Nobel Prize, seven others have received National Medals of Science, and 65 have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Since its founding in 1946, Damon Runyon has invested nearly $275 million and funded more than 3,420 young scientists. One hundred percent of all donations to the Foundation are used to support cutting-edge scientific research. Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from its Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets and endowment.


CONTACT

Kim Kubert
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
212.455.0501
kim.kubert@damonrunyon.org 

June 2, 2014 > Immunotherapy extends long-term survival of melanoma patients

Jedd D. Wolchok, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon-Lilly Clinical Investigator ‘03-‘08) at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, and colleagues, reported the results of an ongoing clinical trial evaluating the safety and activity of combined immunotherapies for treatment of advanced melanoma. Nivolumab (anti-PD-1), an investigational PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4; Yervoy), were given either concurrently or sequentially to these patients. The two-year overall survival rate was 88%. Only several years ago, the two-year survival rate for metastatic melanoma may have been less than 10 percent. These results were reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and featured in The New York Times.

Click here and here for more.

May 8, 2014 > Nanotechnology based drug delivery system developed

Eranthie Weerapana, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator '12-'14) and colleagues at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, have developed new nanotechnology “cage” that can entrap small molecule drugs and infiltrate cancer cells. This is a promising drug delivery system that could be used to fight cancer and other diseases. The results were published in the American Chemical Society journal ACSNano.

Click here for more.

New Discoveries eNewsletter:  May - July 2014

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation | New Discoveries Newsletter

If you are unable to see this eNewsletter properly, click here for the online version

Damon Runyon Logo
May-July 2014
Damon Runyon Newsletter
Dear Damon Runyon Scientists,

Congratulations to the newest awardees of the Clinical Investigator, Fellowship, and the Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Awards: 29 awards were granted, totaling over $7 million.

We have more exciting news to share with you. As you know, the mission of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation is to provide today’s best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research. After a rigorous strategic program review, upon the recommendation of our Scientific Committee, our Board of Directors recently approved increasing our award programs budget over 30%, from $12M to $16M annually. We are pleased to announce that we are expanding existing programs as well as introducing a new pilot program for physician-scientists, all aimed to fill gaps in funding and support the best early career cancer researchers.

One very important change is that we are increasing the Damon Runyon Fellowship to a four-year award (from three years). Almost all other postdoctoral fellowships are currently three years or less. Our new award structure recognizes the reality that virtually all postdoctoral fellowship training now takes 4 to 5 years to complete, on average. In a time of declining NIH funding rates, we believe that it is increasingly important for us to provide additional sustained funding to Damon Runyon Fellows. To give you an idea of how meaningful this is to our fellows, here is one response we received from a current fellow:

Thank you for this amazing gift. In this increasingly uncertain funding climate, I applaud Damon Runyon in its unwavering efforts to support young scientists. Less time writing for funding directly translates into more time thinking about and performing innovative science.”

To address the continuing shortage of MDs going into research, we will be piloting a new Damon Runyon Physician-Scientist Training Award, aimed to capture “late bloomers” -- young physicians who discovered a passion for cancer research during medical school or their residency, but who have not received training in scientific research methods and thus will not be competitive in seeking grant funding. The new award will provide generous funding for four years and, importantly, the ability to work with a world-class mentor who has a proven track record of training MDs to become top scientists. We will also provide funds for medical school loan repayment. We will be launching this award in the fall and will notify you of the RFA and application deadline.

We are hopeful that our programmatic changes will encourage other funders of biomedical research to follow suit with increased support and sustained commitment to early career scientists.

Our Scientific Committees are meeting this fall to select new classes of Damon Runyon Fellows, Dale F. Frey Scientists and Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovators. We are also looking forward to our Annual Fellows’ Retreat, which will take place in Beverly, Massachusetts this year.

Please see below for the latest updates from your fellow Damon Runyon scientists – current and former. These are just the publications and awards that we are aware of, so we apologize if we have not included your work. Thanks again to those of you who have sent us updates on your recent progress. Please continue to stay in touch. Enjoy the summer!

Best regards,
Yung

Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org

        

UPCOMING DEADLINES and EVENTS

Fellowship Award    

Next Application Deadline: August, 15 

Runyon 5K

Sunday, August 3
Yankee Stadium, One East 161st Street, Bronx, New York
9:30am - 2:00pm (staggered start)

Join us for the sixth annual Runyon 5K, a unique cancer research fundraising run/walk that uses Yankee Stadium as its course.  Run or walk the concourses and ramps, climb stairs between levels, and take your own victory laps around the warning track that circles the field.  We welcome participation from you, our scientists, and please tell your family and friends!  You can also support Team Damon Runyon here.


AWARDS and HONORS

2014 Pew-Stewart Scholars for Cancer Research:

Arvin Dar, PhD (Innovator ’14-’16), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York

Agnel Sfier, PhD (Innovator ’13-’15), New York University School of Medicine, New York

 

American Society for Microbiology Career Development Grant for Postdoctoral Women:

Yanling Wang, PhD (Robert Black Fellow ’12-’14), University of California, Los Angeles

 

2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award:

Liron Bar-Peled, PhD (Lallage Feazel Wall Fellow ’14-’17), Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla


PUBLICATIONS

 

The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network

(led by Matthew M. Meyerson, MD, PhD, (Fellow ’95-’98), Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston)

Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma.

Nature 2014 Jul 9; doi:10.1038/nature13385.

 

Omar Abdel-Wahab, MD (Edward P. Evans Foundation Clinical Investigator ’13-'16), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York

Hematopoietic stem cell origin of BRAFV600E mutations in hairy cell leukemia. Chung SS, Kim E, Park JH, Chung YR, Lito P, Teruya-Feldstein J, Hu W, Beguelin W, Monette S, Duy C, Rampal R, Telis L, Patel M, Kim MK, Huberman K, Bouvier N, Berger MF, Melnick AM, Rosen N, Tallman MS, Park CY, Abdel-Wahab O. Sci Transl Med. 2014 May 28;6(238):238ra71.

 

Frequent ASXL2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia patients with t(8;21)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 chromosomal translocations. Micol JB, Duployez N, Boissel N, Petit A, Geffroy S, Nibourel O, Lacombe C, Lapillonne H, Etancelin P, Figeac M, Renneville A, Castaigne S, Leverger G, Ifrah N, Dombret H, Preudhomme C, Abdel-Wahab O, Jourdan E. Blood. 2014 Jun 27. pii: blood-2014-04-571018.

 

Himisha Beltran, MD (Gordon Family Clinical Investigator ’13-’16), Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York

Aggressive variants of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Beltran H, Tomlins S, Aparicio A, Arora V, Rickman D, Ayala G, Huang J, True L, Gleave ME, Soule H, Logothetis C, Rubin MA. Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Jun 1;20(11):2846-50.

 

Sean Bendall, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’14-'16, Fellow '09-'12), Stanford University, Stanford

Single-cell trajectory detection uncovers progression and regulatory coordination in human B cell development. Bendall SC, Davis KL, Amir el-AD, Tadmor MD, Simonds EF, Chen TJ, Shenfeld DK, Nolan GP, Pe'er D. Cell. 2014 Apr 24;157(3):714-25. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.04.005.

 

Michael Bittner, PhD (Fellow ’77-’78), Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix

Mcl-1 mediates TWEAK/Fn14-induced non-small cell lung cancer survival and therapeutic response. Whitsett TG, Mathews IT, Cardone MH, Lena RJ, Pierceall WE, Bittner M, Sima C, LoBello J, Weiss GJ, Tran NL. Mol Cancer Res. 2014 Apr;12(4):550-9. doi: 10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-13-0458.

 

Angela Brooks, PhD (Merck Fellow ’12-’16), Dana Farber Cancer Center, Boston

A pan-cancer analysis of transcriptome changes associated with somatic mutations in U2AF1 reveals commonly altered splicing events. Brooks AN, Choi PS, de Waal L, Sharifnia T, Imielinski M, Saksena G, Pedamallu CS, Sivachenko A, Rosenberg M, Chmielecki J, Lawrence MS, DeLuca DS, Getz G, Meyerson M. PLoS One. 2014 Jan 31;9(1):e87361.

 

Joseph Califano, MD (Clinical Investigator ’01-’06), The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

Novel insight into mutational landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Gaykalova DA, Mambo E, Choudhary A, Houghton J, Buddavarapu K, Sanford T, Darden W, Adai A, Hadd A, Latham G, Danilova LV, Bishop J, Li RJ, Westra WH, Hennessey P, Koch WM, Ochs MF, Califano JA, Sun W. PLoS One. 2014 Mar 25;9(3):e93102. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093102.

 

Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH (Clinical Investigator ’08-’13), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Aspirin and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Relation to the Expression of 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase (HPGD). Fink SP1, Yamauchi M, Nishihara R, Jung S, Kuchiba A, Wu K, Cho E, Giovannucci E, Fuchs CS, Ogino S, Markowitz SD, Chan AT. Sci Transl Med. 2014 Apr 23;6(233):233re2. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3008481.

 

A Prospective Study of Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1/GDF15) and Risk of Colorectal Cancer. Mehta RS1, Song M, Bezawada N, Wu K, Garcia-Albeniz X, Morikawa T, Fuchs CS, Ogino S, Giovannucci EL, Chan AT. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Apr 1;106(4):dju016. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dju016. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

 

Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH and Wendy Garrett MD, PhD (Fellow ’06-’09), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston

Relating the metatranscriptome and metagenome of the human gut. Franzosa EA, Morgan XC, Segata N, Waldron L, Reyes J, Earl AM, Giannoukos G, Boylan MR, Ciulla D, Gevers D, Izard J, Garrett WS, Chan AT, Huttenhower C. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 3;111(22):E2329-38.

 

Clark C. Chen, MD, PhD (Fellow ’04-’06), University of California, San Diego

Genome-wide shRNA screen revealed integrated mitogenic signaling between dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in glioblastoma. Jie Li, Shan Zhu, David Kozono, Kimberly Ng, Diahnn Futalan, Ying Shen, Johnny C. Akers, Tyler Steed, Deepa Kushwaha, Michael Schlabach, Bob S. Carter, Chang-Hyuk Kwon, Frank Furnari, Webster Cavenee, Stephen Elledge, Clark C. Chen.  Oncotarget, March 2014

 

Chonghui Cheng, PhD (Fellow ’01-’03), Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago

Cell type-restricted activity of hnRNPM promotes breast cancer metastasis via regulating alternative splicing. Xu Y, Gao XD, Lee JH, Huang H, Tan H, Ahn J, Reinke LM, Peter ME, Feng Y, Gius D, Siziopikou KP, Peng J, Xiao X, Cheng C. Genes Dev. 2014 Jun 1;28(11):1191-203.

 

Ralph Deberardinis. MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’11-’14), University of Texas SW Medical Center, Dallas

Oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate is required for reductive carboxylation in cancer cells with mitochondrial defects. Mullen AR, Hu Z, Shi X, Jiang L, Boroughs LK, Kovacs Z, Boriack R, Rakheja D, Sullivan LB, Linehan WM, Chandel NS, DeBerardinis RJ. Cell Rep. 2014 Jun 12;7(5):1679-90.

 

Madhav Dhodapkar, MD (Clinical Investigator ’02-’07), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven

Induction of antigen-specific immunity with a vaccine targeting NY-ESO-1 to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205. Dhodapkar MV1, Sznol M, Zhao B, Wang D, Carvajal RD, Keohan ML, Chuang E, Sanborn RE, Lutzky J, Powderly J, Kluger H, Tejwani S, Green J, Ramakrishna V, Crocker A, Vitale L, Yellin M, Davis T, Keler T. Sci Transl Med. 2014 Apr 16;6(232):232ra51.

 

Charles Drake, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’04-’09), The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

Chronic Inflammation in Benign Prostate Tissue Is Associated with High-Grade Prostate Cancer in the Placebo Arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. B. Gurel, M. S. Lucia, I. M. Thompson, P. J. Goodman, C. M. Tangen, A. R. Kristal, H. L. Parnes, A. Hoque, S. M. Lippman, S. Sutcliffe, S. B. Peskoe, C. G. Drake, W. G. Nelson, A. M. De Marzo, E. A. Platz.  Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2014; DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1126

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