February 2, 2015 > New pathway for slowing BRCA tumor growth

Agnel Sfeir, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ‘13-‘15) and colleagues at New York University School of Medicine, New York, reported that inhibiting the action of a particular enzyme called polymerase theta, or PolQ, dramatically slows the growth of tumor cells containing BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations. This could have an impact on breast and ovarian cancers. The findings were published in the journal Nature.

Click here for more.

 

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Grants Prestigious Fellowship, Breakthrough Scientist Awards

Grants totaling $3.76M give early career investigators independence to pursue novel ideas


New York, NY (January 30, 2015)  – The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows at its fall Fellowship Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious, four-year award are outstanding postdoctoral scientists conducting basic and translational cancer research in the laboratories of leading senior investigators across the country. The Fellowship encourages the nation’s most promising young scientists to pursue careers in cancer research by providing them with independent funding ($208,000 each for basic scientists, $248,000 for physician-scientists) to work on innovative projects.

The Committee also named six new recipients of the Damon Runyon-Dale F. Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists.  This award provides additional funding to scientists completing a prestigious Damon Runyon Fellowship Award who have greatly exceeded the Foundation’s highest expectations and are most likely to make paradigm-shifting breakthroughs that transform the way we prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.  Each awardee will receive $100,000 to be used toward their research. 

Recipients of the Damon Runyon-Dale F. Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists:


Angela N. Brooks, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘12-‘15)
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston

Dr. Brooks is developing computational and experimental approaches to study genomic changes that give rise to cancer. She designed a powerful new computational tool that she used to analyze data from The Cancer Genome Atlas; she identified and characterized specific genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma tumors that disrupt a process called splicing. Her goal for the future is to expand her computational analysis to build a database of splicing alterations in many different cancers and to apply these genomic studies to understudied human populations.

Sidi Chen, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘12-‘15)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

Dr. Chen aims to understand the relationship between small RNAs (microRNAs) and cancer. Small RNAs are important regulators of genetic networks inside the cell; perturbation of these networks can lead to malignant cell growth. He is studying the role of microRNAs in tumor metastasis, or spread, in models of lung and liver cancers and will validate his findings using clinical and genomic data from human patients. His goal is to accelerate the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics for cancer by targeting microRNAs.

Robert K. McGinty, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘12-‘16)
Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Dr. McGinty is examining the structure and function of enzymes called methyltransferases. His structural biology approach has already revealed unexpected roles for certain of these enzymes. As these enzymes are commonly misregulated in human leukemias, an understanding of their normal function may provide insight into novel platforms for drug development.

Michael J. Smanski, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘12-‘14)
University of Minnesota, Saint Paul

Dr. Smanski seeks to develop a new platform for accelerating the discovery of anticancer agents from natural sources. He will use “gene cluster” sequence information from microbes to produce anticancer agents in the laboratory. His ultimate goal is to demonstrate that this technique can be used to rapidly produce drug-like molecules in a highly efficient manner.  

Angela J. Waanders, MD, MPH (Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellow ‘12-‘15)
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia
Dr. Waanders is committed to developing more effective treatments for the many children diagnosed with brain tumors each year. Mutations in BRAF, an oncogene that can drive cancer growth, are prevalent in pediatric astrocytomas. Her research has shown that different BRAF mutations identified in these tumors respond differently to targeted BRAF treatments and suggests that combination therapies may be highly effective. Her continued studies will be the basis for moving novel, targeted treatment strategies into the clinic to treat the children afflicted by this devastating cancer.

Arun P. Wiita, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘12-‘14)
University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Wiita is using emerging technologies to study response to chemotherapy in multiple myeloma.  He aims to characterize the genetic changes that underlie development and progression of the disease, and determine how these changes may predict sensitivity to chemotherapy. His goal is to use this information to enable more effective individualized chemotherapeutic regimens for cancer patients. 

November 2014 Damon Runyon Fellows: 

Anupam K. Chakravarty, PhD [HHMI Fellow], with his sponsor Daniel F. Jarosz, PhD, at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, is investigating heritable physical structures, called higher order assemblies, formed upon overexpression of RNA binding proteins. These proteins are consistently overexpressed in multiple cancers. His research will illuminate the mechanism of assembly formation and its role in altering gene regulation, thereby suggesting novel avenues to potential therapeutic intervention.

Matthew R. Clay, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with his sponsor David R. Sherwood, PhD, at Duke University, Durham, is studying how cells in their natural environment move across basement membranes-the extracellular matrix of proteins that surrounds tissues. Basement membrane “breaching” is the first step of cell invasion, which underlies cancer metastasis. These studies will uncover fundamental mechanisms that govern cell invasion and drive the deadly progression of cancers.

Ronald J. Hause, PhD,
with his sponsor Jay A. Shendure, MD, PhD, at the University of Washington, Seattle, is developing new experimental and analytical methods to better understand, interpret and predict how genetic mutations affect individuals’ risks for cancers and responses to chemotherapy. He will use a combination of genomic, biochemical, and machine learning approaches to investigate and model the effects of all possible mutations of a gene involved in chemotherapeutic drug response and relate these results to patient outcome.

Kai Mao, PhD,
with his sponsor Gary Ruvkun, PhD, at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, is studying the cell’s cytoskeleton, which provides the physical structure and shape of a cell. The cytoskeleton is an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy because of its central function in mitosis or cell division, but these chemotherapeutic agents have very high toxicity. He hypothesizes that the next generation of chemotherapy will benefit from the inhibition of these toxin response pathways.

Rand M. Miller, PhD,
with his sponsor Tarun M. Kapoor, PhD, at The Rockefeller University, New York, is interested in understanding the mechanisms by which cancers become resistant to chemotherapeutic agents. Many cancers acquire resistance to drugs by overproducing molecular “pumps” called multidrug resistance proteins, which actively export the toxic drug molecules out of cells. Using a variety of chemical techniques, he will investigate how these pumps mediate drug resistance in cancers, as well as their roles in the maintenance of healthy cellular function.

Sigrid Nachtergaele, PhD,
with her sponsor Chuan He, PhD, at The University of Chicago, Chicago, is investigating the roles of a chemical modification of mRNA called methylation. Many enzymes that add and remove RNA modifications impact developmental processes and cancer proliferation, but how they are regulated remains a mystery. She aims to identify the mechanisms by which mRNA methylation alters gene expression and eventually results in altered cell signaling and growth.

Thomas Norman, PhD,
with his sponsor Jonathan Weissman, PhD, at the University of California, San Francisco, is investigating the role that “epigenetic” differences play in cancer cells’ ability to develop drug resistance. These epigenetic changes result in altered gene expression. He will use a new technique called CRISPRi to systematically tune the expression of different parts of the genome and measure their effects on drug resistance. He hopes that these studies will identify new avenues for reducing resistance and expand our knowledge of the role epigenetic factors play in leukemia and other cancers.

Magdalena E. Potok, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with her sponsor Steven E. Jacobsen, PhD, at University of California, Los Angeles, is investigating how gene expression is controlled by heterochromatin (the physically compacted form of DNA) and genomic instability. In certain plants, reduction in a chemical mark on the chromatin, called H3K27me1, results in heterochromatin decompaction, abnormal gene expression and the production of extra DNA from certain regions. Extra copies of DNA are a sign of genomic instability often observed in cancers.

William Razzell, PhD [HHMI Fellow],
with his sponsor Jennifer A. Zallen, PhD, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, is using cell biological, molecular genetic, and biophysical approaches to understand how cell-derived mechanical forces contribute to tumorigenesis through the modulation of cellular signaling pathways. He will focus on one pathway that is responsive to mechanical forces, the Hippo pathway, which prevents excessive tissue growth during development.

David W. Taylor, PhD, with his sponsor Eva Nogales, PhD, at the University of California, Berkeley, is studying the structural biology of bacterial CRISPR-Cas surveillance complexes, which have been adopted as versatile genome engineering tools. He aims to decipher the principles by which these complexes function and to apply them for cancer research and therapeutics.

Albert Tsai, PhD,
with his sponsor Robert H. Singer, PhD, at HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, is studying a process called translation, by which messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are decoded into proteins. A hallmark of cancer cells is distorted patterns of protein production, leading to uncontrolled growth and invasive behavior. He is using novel microscope technology to image live cells in real-time and developing techniques to image individual protein molecules during their synthesis, thereby linking the time, location and amount of protein production to individual mRNAs.

Jeanine L. Van Nostrand, PhD,
with her sponsor Reuben J. Shaw, PhD, at the Salk Institute, La Jolla, aims to understand how signaling pathways involved in the energetic and metabolic stress responses prevent cancer. She will generate models harboring specific mutations that prevent the stress response, and evaluate the effects of these mutations on lung cancer development.

Aaron D. Viny, MD,
with his sponsor Ross L. Levine, MD, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, is studying the oncogenic role of abnormalities in the cohesin complex-a group of proteins that function to align and stabilize sister chromatids (copies of the chromosomes) during cell division.  Mutations within several proteins in this complex have been identified in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia, the most common adult leukemia.

Jonathan R. Whicher, PhD,
with his sponsor Roderick MacKinnon, MD, at The Rockefeller University, New York, focuses on a cellular structure called the voltage-gated potassium channel Eag1, which can promote tumor growth and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer including breast, colon, prostate, lung, and liver. He is determining the structure and mechanism of Eag1 in order to elucidate how Eag1 promotes cancer growth, with the eventual goal of developing Eag1 modulators as potential anti-cancer therapies.

Andrew L. Wolfe, PhD,
with his sponsor Ramon Parsons, MD, PhD, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, studies PTEN, an anti-cancer protein that opposes cell growth and can induce cancer cells to die. Loss of PTEN protein has been detected in nearly every form of cancer and is associated with drug resistance and poor clinical outcome. A new, longer form of PTEN, called PTEN-L, was recently discovered. He aims to answer fundamental questions about the mechanism and function of PTEN-L, which will characterize the expression and regulation of this important anti-cancer protein for the first time.

####

DAMON RUNYON CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

To accelerate breakthroughs, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides today’s best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research.  The Foundation has gained worldwide prominence in cancer research by identifying outstanding researchers and physician-scientists.  Twelve scientists supported by the Foundation have received the Nobel Prize, and others are heads of cancer centers and leaders of renowned research programs.  Each of its award programs is extremely competitive, with less than 10% of applications funded.  Since its founding in 1946, the Foundation has invested over $287 million and funded more than 3,460 young scientists.  This year it will commit over $15 million in new awards to brilliant young investigators.

100% of all donations to the Foundation are used to support scientific research.  Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from its Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets Service and endowment. 

CONTACT
Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org
212.455.0521

 

 

January 27, 2015 > Identification of two genes that trigger ovarian cancer

Terry Magnuson, PhD (Fellowship Award Committee Member), William Y. Kim, MD (Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator ‘09-‘14), and colleagues at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, created the first mouse model of ovarian clear cell carcinoma using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Specific types of mutation of the genes ARID1A and PIK2CA gave rise to ovarian cancer 100 percent of the time. These mutations led to the overproduction of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a type of protein called a cytokine that is crucial for cell signaling that triggers inflammation. They demonstrated that a known drug can suppress tumor growth. The findings were published in the journal Nature Communications.

Click here for more.

 

January 21, 2015 > Nanoparticles for detecting cancer cells

Moritz F. Kircher, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ‘14-‘16) and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, reported development of a new type of nanoparticle called “nanostars,” which accumulate in tumor cells and scatter light, making the tumors easily visible with a special camera. The nanoparticles cannot enter noncancerous cells in the body, so only the cancer cells light up. The scientists hope that this may one day enable improved identification of tumor margins during surgery, microscopic metastases, and even precancerous cells with high precision. The findings were reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Click here for more.

 

Damon Runyon Annual Report 2014

To view as full screen, click here.

To download as a pdf, click here.

simplebooklet.com

December 31, 2014 > Novel system for 3D culture of pancreatic cancer

Christine Iok In Chio, PhD (Damon Runyon Shirley Stein Fellow ‘13-‘17) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and colleagues, developed a 3D “organoid” culture system for pancreatic cancer that enables growth of pancreatic tissue not only from laboratory mouse models, but also from human patient tissue, offering a path to personalized treatment approaches in the future. The study was published in the journal Cell.

Click here for more.

 

Theater Benefits to Fund Cancer Research

imageimage{filedir_1}Hamilton5x7-RGB-150x210p.jpg_width230" alt="Theater Benefits to Fund Cancer Research" />

Our Theater Benefits offer the chance to attend a dinner at a premier New York restaurant, followed by tickets to a successful or highly anticipated Broadway show.  Guests also have the opportunity to hear first-hand from the scientists themselves about the impact of Damon Runyon funding.

Fall Theater Benefit: Hamilton

Attend Broadway Show & Help Fund Cancer Research

On September 16, 2015, see this year's most highly anticipated show on Broadway and support cancer research! Following an amazing sold-out run at The Public Theater, Lin-Manuel Miranda's critically acclaimed Hamilton will move to Broadway this summer. From the creative team behind the Tony Award-winning In the Heights comes a wildly inventive musical about the scrappy young immigrant who forever changed America: Alexander Hamilton. Lin-Manuel Miranda takes the stage as the unlikely founding father determined to make his mark on a new nation as hungry and ambitious as he is.

Don't miss out! See one of Broadway's most buzzed about shows while supporting new generations of innovative cancer researchers.

Hamilton Theater Benefit
Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Dinner / 5:30pm

Performance / 8:00pm
Richard Rodgers Theatre
226 West 46th Street (between Broadway and 8th Avenue)

Tickets are $600.

For more information or to reserve your Theater Benefit tickets today, please call at 212.455.0501 or email kim.kubert@damonrunyon.org.

 

December 10, 2014 > New connection established between cell metabolism and stem cell identity

Lydia Finley, PhD (Damon Runyon Jack Sorrell Fellow ‘13-‘17) of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, and colleagues, demonstrated that stem cells can rewire their metabolism to enhance a mechanism that helps them avoid committing to a specific fate; in turn, this improves stem cells’ ability to renew themselves.  She showed that the nutrients a stem cell uses, and how it uses them, can contribute to a cell’s fate by influencing gene expression through epigenetic modifications.  This newly established link between metabolism and stem cell fate improves our understanding of development and regeneration, and, of cancer. These results were published in the journal Nature.

Click here for more.

December 9, 2014 > Genetic link to treatment-related cognitive decline in children with leukemia

Peter D. Cole, MD (Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award Committee, Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator ‘03-‘08) of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, and colleagues, reported that common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The findings suggest it may be possible to screen ALL patients for their risk of long-term treatment-related effects on memory, attention and learning and studying potential interventions. These results were presented at the 56th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

Click here for more.

December 8, 2014 > Highly disorganized gene regulation linked to chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Catherine J. Wu, MD (Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator ‘07-‘12) and colleagues at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, found that in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), treatment produced shorter remissions if the tumor tissue showed signs of highly disorganized methylation, chemical modifications on the DNA that regulate gene expression. The findings demonstrate that such disorganization can actually benefit tumors and render them less vulnerable to anti-cancer drugs. The study was published in the journal Cancer Cell.

Click here for more.

December 6, 2014 > New immunotherapy effective for Hodgkin’s lymphoma as well as melanoma

John M. Timmerman, MD (Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator ‘05-‘10) of University of California, Los Angeles, Gordon J. Freeman, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ‘79-'81), of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, and colleagues, reported that an immunotherapy drug called Opdivo/nivolumab, which inhibits the PD-1 pathway, is effective in treatment of relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma.  In a Phase I clinical trial of 23 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with the drug, the rate of progression-free survival was 86%. The results were presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) and published in The New England Journal of Medicine.  The US FDA subsequently approved the drug for treatment of metastatic melanoma and also granted it Breakthrough Therapy Designation in relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma

Click here and here for more.

November 19, 2014 > Genetic mutations predict response to immunotherapy

Jedd D. Wolchok, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon-Lilly Clinical Investigator ‘03-‘08) and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, reported a key discovery that explains why some patients respond to Yervoy/ipilimumab, an immunotherapy drug, while others do not. They found that the cancer cells from patients who respond to the drug carry a high number of genetic mutations--some of which make tumors more visible to the immune system, and therefore easier to fight. In the future, the researchers hope to develop a diagnostic test to detect the mutations in melanoma patients, which could help doctors to make more effective treatment decisions. This study was published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Click here for more.

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Announces New Physician-Scientist Training Award

New York, NY (November 17, 2014) – To help increase the number of physician-scientists, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation (Damon Runyon) has created a new award, the Damon Runyon Physician-Scientist Training Award, which will provide physicians who have earned an MD degree and completed clinical specialty fellowship training the opportunity to gain the research skills they need to work as investigators.    
Interdisciplinary teamwork is an essential component of the most effective biomedical research, particularly translational research, and having a strong physician-scientist on a research team can help ensure that the most promising and applicable discoveries progress quickly and successfully from bench to bedside, to benefit patients suffering from serious disease. The role of physician-scientists in biomedical research has been called pivotal and irreplaceable, but their numbers are dwindling just when they are needed most, particularly in cancer research, as the number of cancer cases is projected to increase by 45 percent in the next fifteen years and elevate cancer to the leading cause of death in America.    
“Too often, doctors who are ‘late bloomers,’ who discover their passion for research after they begin medical school, find it is too late to join an MD-PhD program or otherwise acquire the experience they need to pursue a research career,” said Lorraine W. Egan, president and CEO of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. “Physicians have a huge contribution to make to scientific research but often lack the opportunity and the grant support needed to put them on a research track. We felt it was important to create that opportunity and hope that other foundations and funders will want to do the same.”
The Damon Runyon Physician-Scientist Training Award is a pilot program which will award up to three awards per year initially, beginning in July 2015. Each award will provide four years of significant salary support and research expenses as well as retiring up to $100,000 of any medical school debt still owed by an award recipient. (The average medical school tuition debt is more than $150,000.) Because the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation acknowledges that fellowship-qualified physicians are at a time of life when they may be supporting families, it seeks to address the financial disincentives that may deter some physicians from pursuing a research career, and therefore provides a considerably higher stipend than most research fellowships -- $100,000 in the first year, with increases of $10,000 per year over the next three years.
“Physician-scientists have the unique capacity to blend their insights from treating patients and working in the laboratory in a way that enables and accelerates medical advances,” said Yung S. Lie, PhD, Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. “If the present shortage of physician-scientists continues, we risk a situation in which some major laboratory research discoveries may not reach patients at all, and that would represent a real crisis in cancer research.”
************

About the Foundation

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides funding to young scientists to pursue innovative cancer research. The Foundation’s goals are to identify and fund the best and brightest early-career scientists in cancer research, enable risk-taking on bold new ideas, and accelerate the translation of scientific discoveries into new diagnostic tools and treatments. Damon Runyon is currently funding more than 150 scientists at leading medical centers and research institutions.
100% of all donations to the Foundation are used to support scientific research. Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from its Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets Service and endowment.

For more information visit http://www.damonrunyon.org.

October 31, 2014 > Damon Runyon alumni play key roles in Ebola fight

Two former Damon Runyon Fellows are making key contributions to the fight to stem the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

During her Damon Runyon Fellowship, Pardis C. Sabeti, MD, DPhil, studied how natural selection drives the evolution of diseases like cancer. This summer, Pardis led a team that sequenced the genome of the current Ebola virus from affected individuals in Sierra Leone, tracing the spread of the outbreak back to its origin. Her team has released the sequencing data for use by researchers around the world in hopes that open access to the virus' genetic code will speed breakthroughs in treatment and vaccines. In addition, Dr. Sabeti has been a vocal advocate for researchers and healthcare workers on the front lines of the epidemic, urging governments, international organizations, and researchers around the world to find new ways of collaborating to stop the outbreak.

Read about Dr. Sabeti's work in The New Yorker and The New York Times.

Mark Murray, PhD, CEO of Tekmira Pharmaceuticals, has led his company in developing an experimental Ebola treatment. Called TKM-Ebola, the treatment targets virus proteins using silencing RNAs, potentially interfering with Ebola's ability to replicate itself in the body. Several healthcare workers have received the experimental drug after contracting the virus, and the FDA recently granted the company expanded access permission to test the drug for potential wider use in combating the outbreak.

Read about TKM-Ebola's development in the Wall Street Journal and The International Business Times.

New Discoveries eNewsletter: Oct - Dec 2014

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation | New Discoveries Newsletter

If you are unable to see this eNewsletter properly, click here for the online version

Damon Runyon Logo
October – December 2014
Damon Runyon Newsletter

Dear Damon Runyon Scientists,

Happy holidays from all of us at Damon Runyon! We wish you a healthy and successful new year. 

A few weeks ago, the ASCO Post (a publication of the American Society of Clinical Oncology) featured an op-ed piece by Damon Runyon President and CEO Lorraine Egan, entitled “Why Physician-Scientists Are Indispensable to Cancer Research.”  The op-ed describes why it is urgent that we take action to enable more doctors to follow this important career path and describes the launch of our new Physician-Scientist Training Award.

Our Scientific Committees met this fall to select the newest awardees of the Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award, Fellowship Award and Dale F. Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists. Stay tuned for the announcement of these new awardees in January.

In the meantime, you can watch videos of some of our Damon Runyon Scientists at https://www.youtube.com/user/DamonRunyonFnd?feature=watch. Please pass them on to your family and friends.

Please see below for the latest update on exciting news and findings from your fellow Damon Runyon scientists – current and former. These are just the publications and awards that we are aware of, so we apologize if we have not included your work.  Lay summaries of some of this work are posted on the News page of our website, along with additional news about our Scientific Committee and Board members.  

Thanks again to those of you who have sent us updates on your recent progress. Please continue to stay in touch.

Best regards,
Yung

Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
One Exchange Plaza
55 Broadway, Suite 302
New York, NY 10006
212.455.0521
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org

 

Holiday wishes from Lorraine Egan, our President and CEO:

 

Thank you for your commitment to innovative science and improving human health.  We take great pride in each of the 3,460+ scientists whose careers we helped launch over the past 68 years.  Your impact is immeasurable.  This year, we are increasing our investment in new generations of top scientists by 33% to ensure that we keep the best talent in science.  We hope you will join us to achieve this important goal by donating to Damon Runyon this year.  As always, 100% of your donation will be used to support someone very much like you – a brilliant mind dedicated to discovery and breakthroughs.

All our best for a happy and healthy 2015,

Lorraine

 

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 Join our LinkedIn group for Damon Runyon Scientists.


UPCOMING DEADLINES and EVENTS

Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award
Next application deadline: February 17, 2015

Accelerating Cancer Cures Research Symposium
March 3, 2015
Hosted by Eli Lilly, New York, NY

Damon Runyon Fellowship Award
Next application deadline: March 16, 2015

Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award
Next application deadline: March 16, 2015 

   

 


AWARDS and HONORS

   

2014 Grand Prize winner of theScience & SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists:

Liron Bar-Peled (Fellow ’14-’16),The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla

 

 

PUBLICATIONS

Scott Armstrong, MD, PhD (Sohn Committee Member, Clinical Inestigator '03-'08), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York and James Bradner, MD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’10-’13), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
AF10 Regulates Progressive H3K79 Methylation and HOX Gene Expression in Diverse AML Subtypes.Deshpande AJ, Deshpande A, Sinha AU, Chen L, Chang J, Cihan A, Fazio M, Chen CW, Zhu N, Koche R, Dzhekieva L, Ibáñez G, Dias S, Banka D, Krivtsov A, Luo M, Roeder RG, Bradner JE, Bernt KM, Armstrong SA. Cancer Cell. 2014 Dec 8;26(6):896-908. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2014.10.009.

James E. Bradner, MD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’10-’13), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
Biased multicomponent reactions to develop novel bromodomain inhibitors. McKeown MR, Shaw DL, Fu H, Liu S, Xu X, Marineau JJ, Huang Y, Zhang X, Buckley DL, Kadam A, Zhang Z, Blacklow SC, Qi J, Zhang W, Bradner JE. J Med Chem. 2014 Nov 13;57(21):9019-27. doi: 10.1021/jm501120z.

Pre-clinical analysis of changes in intra-cellular biochemistry of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells due to c-Myc silencing. Rajagopalan V, Vaidyanathan M, Janardhanam VA, Bradner JE. Cell Mol Neurobiol. 2014 Oct;34(7):1059-69. doi: 10.1007/s10571-014-0083-4.

Ken Cadwell, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’11-’12, Fellow ’08-’10), New York University School of Medicine, New York
An enteric virus can replace the beneficial function of commensal bacteria. Kernbauer E, Ding Y, Cadwell K. Nature. 2014 Nov 19. doi: 10.1038/nature13960.

Pedro Batista, PhD (Fellow ’11-’14) and Howard Chang, MD, PhD (Scholar ’05-’08), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford
m(6)A RNA Modification Controls Cell Fate Transition in Mammalian Embryonic Stem Cells. Batista PJ, Molinie B, Wang J, Qu K, Zhang J, Li L, Bouley DM, Lujan E, Haddad B, Daneshvar K, Carter AC, Flynn RA, Zhou C, Lim KS, Dedon P, Wernig M, Mullen AC, Xing Y, Giallourakis CC, Chang HY. Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Dec 4;15(6):707-19. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2014.09.019.

Karlene A. Cimprich, PhD (Fellow ’94-’97) Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford
Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair Factors Promote R-Loop-Induced Genome Instability. Sollier J, Stork CT, García-Rubio ML, Paulsen RD, Aguilera A, Cimprich KA. Mol Cell. 2014 Nov 25. pii: S1097-2765(14)00830-2. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2014.10.020.

Colleen Delaney, MD, MSc (Clinical Investigator ’07-’12) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle
One-unit versus two-unit cord-blood transplantation for hematologic cancers. Wagner JE Jr, Eapen M, Carter S, Wang Y, Schultz KR, Wall DA, Bunin N, Delaney C, Haut P, Margolis D, Peres E, Verneris MR, Walters M, Horowitz MM, Kurtzberg J; Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network. N Engl J Med. 2014 Oct 30;371(18):1685-94. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1405584.

Enhanced generation of cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by culture with StemRegenin1 and Delta1(Ext-IgG.).Dahlberg A, Brashem-Stein C, Delaney C, Bernstein ID. Leukemia. 2014 Oct;28(10):2097-101. doi: 10.1038/leu.2014.181.

Steven F. Dowdy, PhD (Fellow ’90-’93), University of California, San Diego
Efficient delivery of RNAi prodrugs containing reversible charge-neutralizing phosphotriester backbone modifications. Meade BR, Gogoi K, Hamil AS, Palm-Apergi C, Berg Av, Hagopian JC, Springer AD, Eguchi A, Kacsinta AD, Dowdy CF, Presente A, Lönn P, Kaulich M, Yoshioka N, Gros E, Cui XS, Dowdy SF. Nat Biotechnol. 2014 Dec;32(12):1256-61. doi: 10.1038/nbt.3078.

Charles G. Drake, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’04-’09), The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
Lymphocyte Activation Gene 3 (LAG-3) Modulates the Ability of CD4 T-cells to Be Suppressed In Vivo. Durham NM, Nirschl CJ, Jackson CM, Elias J, Kochel CM, Anders RA, Drake CG (2014) PLoS ONE 9(11): e109080. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109080

Guido Franzoso, MD, PhD (Scholar ’00-’02), Imperial College, London
Cancer-selective targeting of the NF-κB survival pathway with GADD45β/MKK7 inhibitors.Tornatore L, Sandomenico A, Raimondo D, Low C, Rocci A, Tralau-Stewart C, Capece D, D'Andrea D, Bua M, Boyle E, van Duin M, Zoppoli P, Jaxa-Chamiec A, Thotakura AK, Dyson J, Walker BA, Leonardi A, Chambery A, Driessen C, Sonneveld P, Morgan G, Palumbo A, Tramontano A, Rahemtulla A, Ruvo M, Franzoso G. Cancer Cell. 2014 Oct 13;26(4):495-508. doi: 10.1016/j.ccr.2014.07.027.

Chuan-Hsiang Huang, PhD (Fellow ’09-’12), The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
Evolutionarily conserved coupling of adaptive and excitable networks mediates eukaryotic chemotaxis. Tang M, Wang M, Shi C, Iglesias PA, Devreotes PN, Huang CH. Nat Commun. 2014 Oct 27;5:5175. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6175.

Calvin H. Jan, PhD (Fellow ’11-’14), University of California, San Francisco
Principles of ER cotranslational translocation revealed by proximity-specific ribosome profiling. Jan CH, Williams CC, Weissman JS. Science. 2014 Nov 7;346(6210):1257521. doi: 10.1126/science.1257521

Kevin B. Jones, MD (Clinical Investigator ’12-’15) University of Utah, Salt Lake City
Modeling alveolar soft part sarcomagenesis in the mouse: a role for lactate in the tumor microenvironment. Goodwin ML, Jin H, Straessler K, Smith-Fry K, Zhu JF, Monument MJ, Grossmann A, Randall RL, Capecchi MR, Jones KB. Cancer Cell. 2014 Dec 8;26(6):851-62. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2014.10.003.

Gabriel C. Lander, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’13-’15, Fellow ’10-’13), The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla
Solid-to-fluid-like DNA transition in viruses facilitates infection. Liu T, Sae-Ueng U, Li D, Lander GC, Zuo X, Jönsson B, Rau D, Shefer I, Evilevitch A. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Oct 14;111(41):14675-80. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1321637111.


Robert K. McGinty, MD, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist '15-'17, Fellow ’12-’16), Pennsylvania State University, College Park
Crystal structure of the PRC1 ubiquitylation module bound to the nucleosome. McGinty RK, Henrici RC, Tan S. Nature. 2014 Oct 30;514(7524):591-6. doi: 10.1038/nature13890.


Elahe A. Mostaghel, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’08-’13) and Peter S. Nelson, MD (Physician-Scientist Committee Member, Scholar ’02-’04) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle

Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis. Mostaghel EA, Morgan A, Zhang X, Marck BT, Xia J, Hunter-Merrill R, Gulati R, Plymate S, Vessella RL, Corey E, Higano CS, Matsumoto AM, Montgomery RB, Nelson PS. PLoS One. 2014 Oct 30;9(10):e111545. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0111545.

Peter S. Nelson, MD (Physician-Scientist Committee Member, Damon Runyon Scholar ’02, ’04) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle
The Androgen-Regulated Protease TMPRSS2 Activates a Proteolytic Cascade Involving Components of the Tumor Microenvironment and Promotes Prostate Cancer Metastasis. Lucas JM, Heinlein C, Kim T, Hernandez SA, Malik MS, True LD, Morrissey C, Corey E, Montgomery B, Mostaghel E, Clegg N, Coleman I, Brown CM, Schneider EL, Craik C, Simon JA, Bedalov A, Nelson PS. Cancer Discov. 2014 Nov;4(11):1310-25. doi: 10.1158/2159-8290.

Jared T. Nordman, PhD (Fellow ’09-’12) Whitehead Institute, Cambridge
DNA Copy-Number Control through Inhibition of Replication Fork Progression. Nordman JT, Kozhevnikova EN, Verrijzer CP, Pindyurin AV, Andreyeva EN, Shloma VV, Zhimulev IF, Orr-Weaver TL. Cell Rep. 2014 Nov 6;9(3):841-9. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.005.

John M. Pagel, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’05-’10), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle
In Vivo Localization of 90Y and 177Lu Radioimmunoconjugates Using Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model. Balkin ER, Kenoyer A, Orozco JJ, Hernandez A, Shadman M, Fisher DR, Green DJ, Hylarides MD, Press OW, Wilbur DS, Pagel JM. Cancer Res. 2014 Oct 15;74(20):5846-54. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472

Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but Not 177Lu Is Effective Treatment in a Syngeneic Murine Leukemia Model.Orozco JJ, Balkin ER, Gooley TA, Kenoyer A, Hamlin DK, Wilbur DS, Fisher DR, Hylarides MD, Shadman M, Green DJ, Gopal AK, Press OW, Pagel JM. PLoS One. 2014 Dec 2;9(12):e113601. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113601.

 

Douglas H. Phanstiel, PhD (Fellow ’12-’15), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford

Sushi.R: flexible, quantitative and integrative genomic visualizations for publication-quality multi-panel figures. Phanstiel DH, Boyle AP, Araya CL, Snyder MP. Bioinformatics. 2014 Oct;30(19):2808-10. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btu379.

 

Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome. Heidari N, Phanstiel DH, He C, Grubert F, Jahanbani F, Kasowski M, Zhang MQ, Snyder MP. Genome Res. 2014 Sep 16. pii: gr.176586.114.


Julien Sage, PhD (Fellowship Committee Member, Scholar ’05-’07), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford

Inhibition of Pluripotency Networks by the Rb Tumor Suppressor Restricts Reprogramming and Tumorigenesis. Kareta MS, Gorges LL, Hafeez S, Benayoun BA, Marro S, Zmoos AF, Cecchini MJ, Spacek D, Batista LF, O'Brien M, Ng YH, Ang CE, Vaka D, Artandi SE, Dick FA, Brunet A, Sage J, Wernig M. Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Nov 13. pii: S1934-5909(14)00470-6. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2014.10.019.

 

Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD (Fellow ’04-’05), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Crizotinib in ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer. Shaw AT, Ou SH, Bang YJ, Camidge DR, Solomon BJ, Salgia R, Riely GJ, Varella-Garcia M, Shapiro GI, Costa DB, Doebele RC, Le LP, Zheng Z, Tan W, Stephenson P, Shreeve SM, Tye LM, Christensen JG, Wilner KD, Clark JW, Iafrate AJ. N Engl J Med. 2014 Nov 20;371(21):1963-71. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1406766.

 

Two Novel ALK Mutations Mediate Acquired Resistance to the Next-Generation ALK Inhibitor Alectinib.Katayama R, Friboulet L, Koike S, Lockerman EL, Khan TM, Gainor JF, Iafrate AJ, Takeuchi K, Taiji M, Okuno Y, Fujita N, Engelman JA, Shaw AT. Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Nov 15;20(22):5686-96. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.

 

Michael J. Smanski, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist '15-'17, Fellow ’12-’14), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Functional optimization of gene clusters by combinatorial design and assembly. Smanski MJ, Bhatia S, Zhao D, Park Y, B A Woodruff L, Giannoukos G, Ciulla D, Busby M, Calderon J, Nicol R, Gordon DB, Densmore D, Voigt CA. Nat Biotechnol. 2014 Nov 24. doi: 10.1038/nbt.3063.

 

John M. Timmerman, MD (Clinical Investigator ’05-’10), University of California, Los Angeles

PD-1 Blockade with Nivolumab in Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Ansell SM, Lesokhin AM, Borrello I, Halwani A, Scott EC, Gutierrez M, Schuster SJ, Millenson MM, Cattry D, Freeman GJ, Rodig SJ, Chapuy B, Ligon AH, Zhu L, Grosso JF, Kim SY, Timmerman JM, Shipp MA, Armand P.  N Engl J Med. 2014 Dec 6.


Jedd D. Wolchok, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’03-’08), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York

Genetic Basis for Clinical Response to CTLA-4 Blockade in Melanoma. Snyder A, Makarov V, Merghoub T, Yuan J, Zaretsky JM, Desrichard A, Walsh LA, Postow MA, Wong P, Ho TS, Hollmann TJ, Bruggeman C, Kannan K, Li Y, Elipenahli C, Liu C, Harbison CT, Wang L, Ribas A, Wolchok JD, Chan TA. N Engl J Med. 2014 Nov 19.

 

Catherine J. Wu, MD (Clinical Investigator ’07-’12), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston

Locally disordered methylation forms the basis of intratumor methylome variation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Landau DA, Clement K, Ziller MJ, Boyle P, Fan J, Gu H, Stevenson K, Sougnez C, Wang L, Li S, Kotliar D, Zhang W, Ghandi M, Garraway L, Fernandes SM, Livak KJ, Gabriel S, Gnirke A, Lander ES, Brown JR, Neuberg D, Kharchenko PV, Hacohen N, Getz G, Meissner A, Wu CJ. Cancer Cell. 2014 Dec 8;26(6):813-25. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2014.10.012.


Joanna Wysocka, PhD (Fellow '04-'06) and Howard Chang, MD, PhD (Scholar ’05-’08), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford

RNA helicase DDX21 coordinates transcription and ribosomal RNA processing. Calo E, Flynn RA, Martin L, Spitale RC, Chang HY, Wysocka J. Nature. 2014 Nov 24. doi: 10.1038/nature13923.


Mark J. Zylka, PhD (Fellow ’00-’03), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Topoisomerase 1 inhibition reversibly impairs synaptic function. Mabb AM, Kullmann PH, Twomey MA, Miriyala J, Philpot BD, Zylka MJ. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Dec 2;111(48):17290-5. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1413204111.


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New Discoveries eNewsletter: Jan - April 2015

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation | New Discoveries Newsletter

If you are unable to see this eNewsletter properly, click here for the online version

Damon Runyon Logo
January – April 2015
Damon Runyon Newsletter

Dear Damon Runyon Scientists,

We started off the year by announcing the newest awardees of the Fellowship, Breakthrough Scientist and Innovation Awards: 27 awards were granted, totaling nearly $5 million. We also selected the first recipients of our new Physician-Scientist Training Award, supporting clinically trained individuals who have the unique capacity to blend their insights from treating patients and working in the laboratory in a way that enables and accelerates progress against cancer. We will announce these awardees soon.

Our Scientific Committees are meeting this spring to select the recipients of the 2015 Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, Damon Runyon Fellowship Award and the Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award. Stay tuned for the announcement of these new awardees in the summer.

We’re also pleased to let you know that we held our fourth annual Accelerating Cancer Cures Research Symposium, focused on rebuilding the ranks of physician-scientists specially trained to translate laboratory discoveries into the clinic. The event, hosted by Lilly Oncology in New York City on March 3, brought together Damon Runyon Clinical Investigators and Innovators, Award Committee and Board Members with scientists from leading pharmaceutical companies, including Genentech, Eli Lilly and Company, Celgene, Merck, Pfizer, and Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Co. The goal of Accelerating Cancer Cures is to eliminate barriers to progress by fostering communication and collaboration between academia and industry.

If you haven’t already done so, join our Damon Runyon Scientists group on LinkedIn. This is important so that we can continue to keep in touch with you as you advance in your career. It also enables you to network with other Damon Runyon scientists, which is a valuable resource.

Please see below for the latest update on exciting news and findings from your fellow Damon Runyon scientists – current and former. These are just the publications and awards that we are aware of, so we apologize if we have not included your work. Lay summaries of some of this work are posted on the New Discoveries page of our website, along with additional news about our Scientific Committee and Board members.

Thanks again to those of you who have sent us updates on your recent progress. Please continue to stay in touch.

Best regards,
Yung

Yung S. Lie, PhD

Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer

Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
One Exchange Plaza
55 Broadway, Suite 302
New York, NY 10006
212.455.0521
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org

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 Join our LinkedIn group for Damon Runyon Scientists.

IN MEMORIAM

Carl Djerassi, PhD (Damon Runyon Grantee ’55) - (1923-2015)

UPCOMING DEADLINES and EVENTS

Innovation Award Next application deadline: July 1

Dale Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists Next application deadline: July 15

Fellowship Award Next application deadline: August 15

Raveis Ride and Walk Supporting Damon RunyonSave the dates: August 22, Hingham, MA and September 12, Fairfield, CT

Gather your family and friends, and get involved with a fun-filled event for an amazing cause! You can choose between a 12-mile bike ride, a 25-mile bike ride, and a 5k walk. Register now at www.raveisridewalk.com

Runyon 5K at Yankee Stadium Save the date: November 15, 2015

Join us this fall for the seventh annual Runyon 5K, a unique cancer research fundraising run/walk that uses Yankee Stadium as its course. Run or walk the concourses and ramps, climb stairs between levels, and take your own victory laps around the warning track that circles the field. We welcome participation from you, our scientists, and please tell your family and friends! Stay tuned for more details: registration will open in July.

   

AWARDS and HONORS

 

 

39th annual AACR-Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award:
William C. Hahn, MD, PhD (Fellow ’98-’99), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston                                                                                                                 

2015 American Association of Anatomists C.J. Herrick Award in Neuroanatomy:
Feng Zhang, PhD (Innovator ’12-’14), Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge

2014 Prostate Cancer Foundation Challenge Award:
Himisha Beltran, MD (Clinical Investigator ’13-’16), Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York

2014 Karl Blume Award from the journal Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and American Society for BMT:
Marie Bleakley, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’11-’16), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle

 

 

 

 

NEW APPOINTMENTS and PROMOTIONS 

                                                
Arun Wiita, MD, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’12-14, Fellow ’15-’16)
Assistant Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco                                                         

Anne Bothmer, PhD (Fellow ’12-’14)
Scientist, Editas Medicine, Cambridge

Xi Huang, PhD (Fellow ’11-’14)
Scientist, Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program at the Hospital for Sick Children
Assistant Professor, University of Toronto

Akinyemi I. Ojesina, MD, PhD (Fellow ’08-’11)
Assistant Professor of Epidemiology
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Adjunct Faculty Investigator, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology                                                 

PUBLICATIONS

 

Ash A. Alizadeh, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’14-’17), Stanford University, Stanford
Mutations in early follicular lymphoma progenitors are associated with suppressed antigen presentation. Green MR, Kihira S, Liu CL, Nair RV, Salari R, Gentles AJ, Irish J, Stehr H, Vicente-Dueñas C, Romero-Camarero I, Sanchez-Garcia I, Plevritis SK, Arber DA, Batzoglou S, Levy R, Alizadeh AA. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Mar 10;112(10):E1116-25. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1501199112.

Carey K. Anders, MD (Clinical Investigator ’12-’15), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and C. Ryan Miller, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’09-’12),University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Efficacy of Carboplatin Alone and in Combination with ABT888 in Intracranial Murine Models of BRCA-Mutated and BRCA-Wild-Type Triple-Negative Breast Cancer. Karginova O, Siegel MB, Van Swearingen AE, Deal AM, Adamo B, Sambade MJ, Bazyar S, Nikolaishvili-Feinberg N, Bash R, O'Neal S, Sandison K, Parker JS, Santos C, Darr D, Zamboni W, Lee YZ, Miller CR, Anders CK. Mol Cancer Ther. 2015 Mar 30.

Laura D. Attardi, PhD (Damon Runyon Scholar ’02-’04), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford
The p53 Target Gene Siva Enables Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Development. Van Nostrand JL, Brisac A, Mello SS, Jacobs SB, Luong R, Attardi LD.

Analysis of p53 transactivation domain mutants reveals Acad11 as a metabolic target important for p53 pro-survival function. Jiang D, LaGory EL, Kenzelmann Brož D, Bieging KT, Brady CA, Link N, Abrams JM, Giaccia AJ, Attardi LD. Cell Rep. 2015 Feb 24;10(7):1096-109. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.01.043.

Christine Beck, PhD (Fellow ’12-’17), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston
Complex Genomic Rearrangements at the PLP1 Locus Include Triplication and Quadruplication.. PLoS Genet 11(3): e1005050. Beck CR, Carvalho CMB, Banser L, Gambin T, Stubbolo D, et al. (2015)

Adrian P. Bird, PhD (Fellow ’71-’73), University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh
Synthetic CpG islands reveal DNA sequence determinants of chromatin structure. Wachter E, Quante T, Merusi C, Arczewska A, Stewart F, Webb S, Bird A. Elife. 2014 Sep 26;3:e03397. doi: 10.7554/eLife.03397.

Robert K. Bradley, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’12-’13, Fellow ’09-’11), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research, Seattle
A feedback loop between nonsense-mediated decay and the retrogene DUX4 in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Feng Q, Snider L, Jagannathan S, Tawil R, van der Maarel SM, Tapscott SJ, Bradley RK. Elife. 2015 Jan 7;4. doi: 10.7554/eLife.04996.

James E. Bradner, MD (Innovator ’11-’13), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston and Nathanael S. Gray, PhD (Innovator ‘08-‘10), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
Targeting transcriptional addictions in small cell lung cancer with a covalent CDK7 inhibitor. Christensen CL, Kwiatkowski N, Abraham BJ, Carretero J, Al-Shahrour F, Zhang T, Chipumuro E, Herter-Sprie GS, Akbay EA, Altabef A, Zhang J, Shimamura T, Capelletti M, Reibel JB, Cavanaugh JD, Gao P, Liu Y, Michaelsen SR, Poulsen HS, Aref AR, Barbie DA, Bradner JE, George RE, Gray NS, Young RA, Wong KK. Cancer Cell. 2014 Dec 8;26(6):909-22.

Jamie H. Cate, PhD (Fellow ’98-’99), University of California, Berkeley
Selection of chromosomal DNA libraries using a multiplex CRISPR system. Ryan OW, Skerker JM, Maurer MJ, Li X, Tsai JC, Poddar S, Lee ME, DeLoache W, Dueber JE, Arkin AP, Cate JH. Elife. 2014 Aug 19;3. doi: 10.7554/eLife.03703.

eIF3 targets cell-proliferation messenger RNAs for translational activation or repression. Lee AS, Kranzusch PJ, Cate JH. Nature. 2015 Apr 6. doi: 10.1038/nature14267.

Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH (Clinical Investigator ’08-’13), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
Association of aspirin and NSAID use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants. Nan H, Hutter CM, Lin Y, Jacobs EJ, Ulrich CM, White E, Baron JA, Berndt SI, Brenner H, Butterbach K, Caan BJ, Campbell PT, Carlson CS, Casey G, Chang-Claude J, Chanock SJ, Cotterchio M, Duggan D, Figueiredo JC, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci EL, Gong J, Haile RW, Harrison TA, Hayes RB, Hoffmeister M, Hopper JL, Hudson TJ, Jenkins MA, Jiao S, Lindor NM, Lemire M, Le Marchand L, Newcomb PA, Ogino S, Pflugeisen BM, Potter JD, Qu C, Rosse SA, Rudolph A, Schoen RE, Schumacher FR, Seminara D, Slattery ML, Thibodeau SN, Thomas F, Thornquist M, Warnick GS, Zanke BW, Gauderman WJ, Peters U, Hsu L, Chan AT; CCFR; GECCO. JAMA. 2015 Mar 17;313(11):1133-42. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.1815.

Sidi Chen, PhD (Fellow ’12-’15), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge and Feng Zhang, PhD (Innovator ’12-’14), Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge
Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in a Mouse Model of Tumor Growth and Metastasis. Chen S, Sanjana NE, Zheng K, Shalem O, Lee K, Shi X, Scott DA, Song J, Pan JQ, Weissleder R, Lee H, Zhang F, Sharp PA. Cell. 2015 Mar 4. pii: S0092-8674(15)00204-4.

Christine Iok In Chio, PhD (Shirley Stein Fellow ‘13-‘17), Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor
Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer. Boj SF, Hwang CI, Baker LA, Chio II, Engle DD, Corbo V, Jager M, Ponz-Sarvise M, Tiriac H, Spector MS, Gracanin A, Oni T, Yu KH, van Boxtel R, Huch M, Rivera KD, Wilson JP, Feigin ME, Öhlund D, Handly-Santana A, Ardito-Abraham CM, Ludwig M, Elyada E, Alagesan B, Biffi G, Yordanov GN, Delcuze B, Creighton B, Wright K, Park Y, Morsink FH, Molenaar IQ, Borel Rinkes IH, Cuppen E, Hao Y, Jin Y, Nijman IJ, Iacobuzio-Donahue C, Leach SD, Pappin DJ, Hammell M, Klimstra DS, Basturk O, Hruban RH, Offerhaus GJ, Vries RG, Clevers H, Tuveson DA. Cell. 2015 Jan 15;160(1-2):324-38.

Rachael A. Clark, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’08-’13), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston
Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells. Watanabe R, Gehad A, Yang C, Scott LL, Teague JE, Schlapbach C, Elco CP, Huang V, Matos TR, Kupper TS, Clark RA. Sci Transl Med. 2015 Mar 18;7(279):279ra39. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3010302.

Ryan B. Corcoran, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’12-’15), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
Clinical Acquired Resistance to RAF Inhibitor Combinations in BRAF-Mutant Colorectal Cancer through MAPK Pathway Alterations. Ahronian LG, Sennott EM, Van Allen EM, Wagle N, Kwak EL, Faris JE, Godfrey JT, Nishimura K, Lynch KD, Mermel CH, Lockerman EL, Kalsy A, Gurski JM Jr, Bahl S, Anderka K, Green LM, Lennon NJ, Huynh TG, Mino-Kenudson M, Getz G, Dias-Santagata D, Iafrate AJ, Engelman JA, Garraway LA, Corcoran RB. Cancer Discov. 2015 Apr;5(4):358-67. doi: 10.1158/2159-8290.CD-14-1518.

Leah E. Cowen, PhD (Fellow ’03-’05), University of Toronto, Toronto
Global analysis of fungal morphology exposes mechanisms of host cell escape. O'Meara TR, Veri AO, Ketela T, Jiang B, Roemer T, Cowen LE. Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 31;6:6741. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7741.

Jason M. Crawford, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’12-14, Fellow ’09-’11), Yale University, New Haven
The colibactin warhead crosslinks DNA
Vizcaino MI, Crawford JM. Nat Chem 2015. doi:10.1038/nchem.2221

Charles G. Drake, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’04-’09), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1 Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen. Sharabi AB, Nirschl CJ, Kochel CM, Nirschl TR, Francica BJ, Velarde E, DeWeese TL, Drake CG. Cancer Immunol Res. 2014 Dec 19. pii: canimm.0196.2014.

Jakob Dupont, MD (Clinical Investigator ’04-’06), OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Redwood City
A phase I dose escalation and expansion study of the anticancer stem cell agent demcizumab (anti-DLL4) in patients with previously treated solid tumors. Smith DC, Eisenberg PD, Manikhas G, Chugh R, Gubens MA, Stagg RJ, Kapoun AM, Xu L, Dupont J, Sikic B. Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Dec 15;20(24):6295-303. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-1373.

Sandra E. Encalada, PhD (Fellow ’04-’05), The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla
Characterizing the composition of molecular motors on moving axonal cargo using "cargo mapping" analysis.. Neumann S, Campbell GE, Szpankowski L, Goldstein LSB, Encalada SE*. (2014). J. Vis. Exp. (92), e52029, doi:10.3791/52029.

Biophysical challenges to axonal transport: motor-cargo deficiencies and neurodegeneration. Encalada SE, Goldstein LSB. Annu Rev Biophys. 2014, 43:7.1-7.29. doi:10.1146/annurev-biophys-051013-022746.

Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function. Otero MG, Alloatti M, Cromberg LE, Almenar-Queralt A, Encalada SE, Pozo Devoto VM, Goldstein LSB, Falzone TL. J. Cell Sci. 2014, 127: 1537-1549.

Lydia Finley, PhD (Fellow ‘13-‘17), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York
Intracellular α-ketoglutarate maintains the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. Carey BW, Finley LW, Cross JR, Allis CD, Thompson CB. Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):413-6.

Elaine V. Fuchs, PhD (Damon Runyon Board Member, Fellow ’77) The Rockefeller University, New York
Pioneer factors govern super-enhancer dynamics in stem cell plasticity and lineage choice. Adam RC, Yang H, Rockowitz S, Larsen SB, Nikolova M, Oristian DS, Polak L, Kadaja M, Asare A, Zheng D, Fuchs E. Nature. 2015 Mar 18. doi: 10.1038/nature14289.

TGF-β Promotes Heterogeneity and Drug Resistance in Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Oshimori N, Oristian D, Fuchs E. Cell. 2015 Feb 26;160(5):963-76. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.01.043.

Rachel Green, PhD (Fellow ’93-’96, Innovation Committee Member ’08-‘14), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches. Koutmou KS, Schuller AP, Brunelle JL, Radhakrishnan A, Djuranovic S, Green R. Elife. 2015 Feb 19;4. doi: 10.7554/eLife.05534.

William C. Hahn, MD, PhD (Fellow ’08-’09), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
TRAF2 is an NF-κB-activating oncogene in epithelial cancers. R R Shen, A Y Zhou, E Kim, J T O'Connell, D Hagerstrand, R Beroukhim and W C Hahn. Oncogene 2015 34: 209-216; advance online publication, December 23, 2013; 10.1038/onc.2013.543

Itamar Harel, PhD (Fellow ’13-’14), Stanford University, Stanford
A platform for rapid exploration of aging and diseases in a naturally short-lived vertebrate. Harel I, Benayoun BA, Machado B, Singh PP, Hu CK, Pech MF, Valenzano DR, Zhang E, Sharp SC, Artandi SE, Brunet A. Cell. 2015 Feb 26;160(5):1013-26.

Jay R. Hesselberth, PhD (Innovator ’12-’14), University of Colorado, Denver
Ribose-seq: global mapping of ribonucleotides embedded in genomic DNA. Koh KD, Balachander S, Hesselberth JR, Storici F. Nat Methods. 2015 Mar;12(3):251-7. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.3259.

John V. Heymach, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’04-’09), MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston
Circulating cytokines and monocyte subpopulations as biomarkers of outcome and biological activity in sunitinib-treated patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Zurita AJ, Khajavi M, Wu HK, Tye L, Huang X, Kulke MH, Lenz HJ, Meropol NJ, Carley W, DePrimo SE, Lin E, Wang X, Harmon CS, Heymach JV. Br J Cancer. 2015 Mar 31;112 Suppl:1199-205. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2015.73.

Susan M. Kaech, PhD (Fellow ’99-’02), Yale University, New Haven
Prostaglandin E2 and programmed cell death 1 signaling coordinately impair CTL function and survival during chronic viral infection. Chen JH, Perry CJ, Tsui YC, Staron MM, Parish IA, Dominguez CX, Rosenberg DW, Kaech SM. Nat Med. 2015 Apr;21(4):327-334. doi: 10.1038/nm.3831.

The transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway is critical for the formation of CD4 T follicular helper cells and isotype-switched antibody responses in the lung mucosa. Marshall HD, Ray JP, Laidlaw BJ, Zhang N, Gawande D, Staron MM, Craft J, Kaech SM. Elife. 2015 Jan 8;4:e04851. doi: 10.7554/eLife.04851.

William Y. Kim, MD (Clinical Investigator ‘09-‘14), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Coexistent ARID1A-PIK3CA mutations promote ovarian clear-cell tumorigenesis through pro-tumorigenic inflammatory cytokine signalling. Chandler RL, Damrauer JS, Raab JR, Schisler JC, Wilkerson MD, Didion JP, Starmer J, Serber D, Yee D, Xiong J, Darr DB, de Villena FP, Kim WY, Magnuson T. Nat Commun. 2015 Jan 27;6:6118.

Moritz F. Kircher, MD, PhD (Innovator ’14-’16), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York
Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering nanostars for high-precision cancer imaging. Harmsen S, Huang R, Wall MA, Karabeber H, Samii JM, Spaliviero M, White JR, Monette S, O'Connor R, Pitter KL, Sastra SA, Saborowski M, Holland EC, Singer S, Olive KP, Lowe SW, Blasberg RG, Kircher MF. Sci Transl Med. 2015 Jan 21;7(271):271ra7.

Young Kwon, PhD (Fellow ’09- ’11), Harvard Medical School, Boston
Systemic Organ Wasting Induced by Localized Expression of the Secreted Insulin/IGF Antagonist ImpL2. Young Kwon, Wei Song, Ilia A. Droujinine, Yanhui Hu, John M. Asara, Norbert Perrimon. Developmental Cell, doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2015.02.012

Gabriel C. Lander, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’13-`15, Fellow ’10-’13), The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla
Structural organization of the dynein-dynactin complex bound to microtubules. Chowdhury S, Ketcham SA, Schroer TA, Lander GC. Nat Struct Mol Biol. 2015 Apr;22(4):345-7. doi: 10.1038/nsmb.2996.

Li Li, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’01-’06), Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland
Combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin exhibits synergistic chemopreventive effects on colorectal neoplasia in rats and mice. Li W, Wang QL, Liu X, Dong SH, Li HX, Li CY, Guo LS, Gao JM, Berger NA, Li L, Ma L, Wu YJ. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2015 Feb;8(2):139-48. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-14-0128.

Steven Lin, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ’13-’17), University of California, Berkeley
Enhanced homology-directed human genome engineering by controlled timing of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery. Lin S, Staahl B, Alla RK, Doudna JA. Elife. 2014 Dec 15;3. doi: 10.7554/eLife.04766.

Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’13-’16) Vanderbilt University, Nashville
Impact of NRAS Mutations for Patients with Advanced Melanoma Treated with Immune Therapies. Johnson DB, Lovly CM, Flavin M, Panageas KS, Ayers GD, Zhao Z, Iams WT, Colgan M, DeNoble S, Terry CR, Berry EG, Iafrate AJ, Sullivan RJ, Carvajal RD, Sosman JA. Cancer Immunol Res. 2015 Mar;3(3):288-95. doi: 10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-14-0207.

Ivan Maillard, MD, PhD (Innovator ’09-’11, Fellow ’05-’07,), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Transient Blockade of Delta-like Notch Ligands Prevents Allograft Rejection Mediated by Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms in a Mouse Model of Heart Transplantation. Wood S, Feng J, Chung J, Radojcic V, Sandy-Sloat AR, Friedman A, Shelton A, Yan M, Siebel CW, Bishop DK, Maillard I. J Immunol. 2015 Mar 15;194(6):2899-908. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1402034.

Diane Mathis, PhD (Fellow ’77-’78), Harvard Medical School, Boston
Epigenetic modulation of type-1 diabetes via a dual effect on pancreatic macrophages and β cells. Fu W, Farache J, Clardy SM, Hattori K, Mander P, Lee K, Rioja I, Weissleder R, Prinjha RK, Benoist C, Mathis D. Elife. 2014 Nov 19;3. doi: 10.7554/eLife.04631.

Sarkis K. Mazmanian, PhD (Innovator ’08-’10), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena
Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease. Sharon G, Garg N, Debelius J, Knight R, Dorrestein PC, Mazmanian SK. Cell Metab. 2014 Nov 4;20(5):719-30. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.016.

Eirini Papapetrou, MD, PhD (Edward P. Evans Foundation Innovator ’13-’16), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York
Functional analysis of a chromosomal deletion associated with myelodysplastic syndromes using isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cells. Kotini AG, Chang CJ, Boussaad I, Delrow JJ, Dolezal EK, Nagulapally AB, Perna F, Fishbein GA, Klimek VM, Hawkins RD, Huangfu D, Murry CE, Graubert T, Nimer SD, Papapetrou EP. Nat Biotechnol. 2015 Mar 23.

Maximilian W. Popp, PhD (HHMI Fellow ’12-15), University of Rochester, Rochester
Attenuation of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay facilitates the response to chemotherapeutics. Popp MW, Maquat LE. Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 26;6:6632. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7632.

Agnel Sfeir, PhD (Innovator ‘13-‘15), New York University School of Medicine, New York
Mammalian polymerase θ promotes alternative NHEJ and suppresses recombination. Mateos-Gomez PA, Gong F, Nair N, Miller KM, Lazzerini-Denchi E, Sfeir A. Nature. 2015 Feb 12;518(7538):254-7.

Jean Y. Tang, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’11-’16), Stanford University, Stanford
Smoothened variants explain the majority of drug resistance in Basal cell carcinoma. Atwood SX, Sarin KY, Whitson RJ, Li JR, Kim G, Rezaee M, Ally MS, Kim J, Yao C, Chang AL, Oro AE, Tang JY. Cancer Cell. 2015 Mar 9;27(3):342-53. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2015.02.002.

David W. Taylor, PhD (Fellow ’15-’19), University of California, Berkeley
Structures of the CRISPR-Cmr complex reveal mode of RNA target positioning. Taylor DW, Zhu Y, Staals RH, Kornfeld JE, Shinkai A, van der Oost J, Nogales E, Doudna JA. Science. 2015 Apr 2. pii: aaa4535.

Benjamin Tu, PhD (Innovator ’11-’13), University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas
Acetate dependence of tumors. Comerford SA, Huang Z, Du X, Wang Y, Cai L, Witkiewicz AK, Walters H, Tantawy MN, Fu A, Manning HC, Horton JD, Hammer RE, McKnight SL, Tu BP. Cell. 2014 Dec 18;159(7):1591-602.

Matthew G. Vander Heiden, MD, PhD (Innovator ’11-’13, Fellow ’06-’08), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
Pyruvate kinase isoform expression alters nucleotide synthesis to impact cell proliferation. Lunt SY, Muralidhar V, Hosios AM, Israelsen WJ, Gui DY, Newhouse L, Ogrodzinski M, Hecht V, Xu K, Acevedo PN, Hollern DP, Bellinger G, Dayton TL, Christen S, Elia I, Dinh AT, Stephanopoulos G, Manalis SR, Yaffe MB, Andrechek ER, Fendt SM, Vander Heiden MG. Mol Cell. 2015 Jan 8;57(1):95-107. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2014.10.027.

Robert H. Vonderheide, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’00-’05), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Induction of T-cell Immunity Overcomes Complete Resistance to PD-1 and CTLA-4 Blockade and Improves Survival in Pancreatic Carcinoma. Winograd R, Byrne KT, Evans RA, Odorizzi PM, Meyer AR, Bajor DL, Clendenin C, Stanger BZ, Furth EE, Wherry EJ, Vonderheide RH. Cancer Immunol Res. 2015 Apr;3(4):399-411. doi: 10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-14-0215.

Catherine J. Wu, MD (Clinical Investigator ‘07-‘12), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
Locally disordered methylation forms the basis of intratumor methylome variation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Landau DA, Clement K, Ziller MJ, Boyle P, Fan J, Gu H, Stevenson K, Sougnez C, Wang L, Li S, Kotliar D, Zhang W, Ghandi M, Garraway L, Fernandes SM, Livak KJ, Gabriel S, Gnirke A, Lander ES, Brown JR, Neuberg D, Kharchenko PV, Hacohen N, Getz G, Meissner A, Wu CJ. Cancer Cell. 2014 Dec 8;26(6):813-25.

© 2011 Damon Runyon. All Rights Reserved  |  Privacy policy

 

New Discoveries eNewsletter:  July - Oct 2014

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation | New Discoveries Newsletter

 

Damon Runyon Logo
July – October 2014
Damon Runyon Newsletter

Dear Damon Runyon Scientists,

We've just returned from our fourteenth annual Fellows' Retreat in Beverly, Massachusetts. Seventy-six first- and third-year Fellows and Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Fellows joined us for a terrific conference. Our Damon Runyon Alumnus Speaker was Matthew L. Meyerson, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow ’95-’98), Professor of Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School; Senior Associate Member, Broad Institute. The Keynote Speakers were Stephen H. Friend, MD, PhD, President and Director of Sage Bionetworks, and Gustavo A. Stolovitzky, PhD, Functional Genomics and Systems Biology Group at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University. We were also joined by seven members of our Fellowship Award Committee (FAC). As always, it was a huge pleasure to learn about the Fellows' research progress and spend time with them informally as well. The FAC will meet in November to select a new class of Fellows and Dale F. Frey Scientists.

This past week, the Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award Committee met at our office in New York City to hear progress reports from our second-year Innovators and to select finalists for the 2015 class of Innovators. Stay tuned for our announcement of the new Innovators in January.

Lastly, thank you to all of you who participated in and/or supported our sixth annual Damon Runyon 5K at Yankee Stadium. It was a great success, with $575,000 raised for cancer research.

Thanks again to those of you who have sent us updates on your recent progress. Have a wonderful fall, and please continue to stay in touch.

Best regards,
Yung

Yung S. Lie, PhD
Deputy Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
One Exchange Plaza
55 Broadway, Suite 302
New York, NY 10006
212.455.0521
yung.lie@damonrunyon.org


UPCOMING DEADLINES and EVENTS

Damon Runyon Physician-Scientist Training Award
Application deadline: December 1, 2014

Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award
Next application deadline: February 17, 2015

Accelerating Cancer Cures Research Symposium
March 3, 2015

Damon Runyon Fellowship Award
Next application deadline: March 16, 2015

Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award
Next application deadline: March 16, 2015 

   

AWARDS and HONORS

   

Elected to the Institute of Medicine:
Todd R. Golub, MD (Damon Runyon Board Member), The Broad Institute, Cambridge

2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology:

Gordon J. Freeman, PhD (Fellow ’79-’81), Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston

MIT Technology Review’s list of “35 Innovators under 35”:
Emily P. Balskus, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’14-’16), Harvard University, Cambridge

2014 NYSCF-Robertson Stem Cell Investigator:
Feng Zhang, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’12-’14), The Broad Institute and MIT, Cambridge

   

 IN MEMORIAM

Emmanuel Farber, MD, PhD (Grantee ’68-’69)
1918-2014

   

 NEW APPOINTMENTS and PROMOTIONS

Raymond E. Moellering, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’14-’15, Fellow ’11-’13)
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology
University of Chicago

Michael J. Smanski, PhD (Fellow ’12-’14)
Assistant Professor
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics
University of Minnesota

Sabrina L. Spencer, PhD (Fellow ’10-’13)
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of Colorado, Boulder

Jesse Zalatan, PhD (Fellow ’09-’11)
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry
University of Washington

 

 

PUBLICATIONS

Ronald J. Buckanovich, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’08-’11), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Combination cediranib and olaparib versus olaparib alone for women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer: a randomised phase 2 study.
Liu JF, Barry WT, Birrer M, Lee JM, Buckanovich RJ, Fleming GF, Rimel B, Buss MK, Nattam S, Hurteau J, Luo W, Quy P, Whalen C, Obermayer L, Lee H, Winer EP, Kohn EC, Ivy SP, Matulonis UA. Lancet Oncol. 2014 Oct;15(11):1207-14. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)70391-2.

Ken Cadwell, PhD (Dale Frey Scientist ’11-’12, Fellow ’08-’10), New York University School of Medicine, New York
Autophagy Gene Atg16l1 Prevents Lethal T Cell Alloreactivity Mediated by Dendritic Cells.
Hubbard-Lucey VM, Shono Y, Maurer K, West ML, Singer NV, Ziegler CG, Lezcano C, Motta AC, Schmid K, Levi SM, Murphy GF, Liu C, Winkler JD, Amaravadi RK, Rogler G, Dickinson AM, Holler E, van den Brink MR, Cadwell K. Immunity. 2014 Oct 8. pii: S1074-7613(14)00345-8. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2014.09.011.

Kenneth Chen, MD (Sohn Fellow ’13-’17), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas
Somatic mutations in DROSHA and DICER1 impair microRNA biogenesis through distinct mechanisms in Wilms tumours.
Rakheja D, Chen KS, Liu Y, Shukla AA, Schmid V, Chang TC, Khokhar S, Wickiser JE, Karandikar NJ, Malter JS, Mendell JT, Amatruda JF. Nat Commun. 2014 Sep 5;2:4802. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5802.

Sidi Chen, PhD (Fellow ’12-’15), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Feng Zhang, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’12-’14), The Broad Institute and MIT, Cambridge
CRISPR-Cas9 Knockin Mice for Genome Editing and Cancer Modeling.
Platt RJ, Chen S, Zhou Y, Yim MJ, Swiech L, Kempton HR, Dahlman JE, Parnas O, Eisenhaure TM, Jovanovic M, Graham DB, Jhunjhunwala S, Heidenreich M, Xavier RJ, Langer R, Anderson DG, Hacohen N, Regev A, Feng G, Sharp PA, Zhang F. Cell. 2014 Oct 9;159(2):440-55. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.09.014.

Oscar R. Colegio, MD, PhD (Fellow ’09-’10), Yale University, New Haven
Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.
Colegio OR, Chu NQ, Szabo AL, Chu T, Rhebergen AM, Jairam V, Cyrus N, Brokowski CE, Eisenbarth SC, Phillips GM, Cline GW, Phillips AJ, Medzhitov R. Nature. 2014 Sep 25;513(7519):559-63.

Damian C. Ekiert, PhD (Fellow ’12-’16), University of California, San Francisco
Structure of a PE-PPE-EspG complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals molecular specificity of ESX protein secretion.
Ekiert DC, Cox JS. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Oct 1. pii: 201409345.

Mary Williard Elting, PhD (Fellow ’13-’17), University of California, San Francisco
Force on spindle microtubule minus ends moves chromosomes.
Elting MW, Hueschen CL, Udy DB, Dumont S. J Cell Biol. 2014 Jul 21;206(2):245-56. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201401091.

Dean W. Felsher, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator ’03-’08), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford
Activation of Cre Recombinase Alone Can Induce Complete Tumor Regression.
Li Y, Choi PS, Casey SC, Felsher DW. PLOS ONE. 2014 Sep 10;9(9): e107589. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107589

Maria Genander, PhD (Fellow ’11), and Elaine Fuchs, PhD (Fellow ’77), The Rockefeller University
BMP Signaling and Its pSMAD1/5 Target Genes Differentially Regulate Hair Follicle Stem Cell Lineages. Genander M, Cook PJ, Ramsköld D, Keyes BE, Mertz AF, Sandberg R, Fuchs E. Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Oct 8. pii: S1934-5909(14)00400-7. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2014.09.009.

Junjie U. Guo, PhD (Fellow ’13-’16), Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge
Expanded identification and characterization of mammalian circular RNAs.
Guo JU, Agarwal V, Guo H, Bartel DP. Genome Biol. 2014 Jul 29;15(7):409.

John J. Karijolich, PhD (Fellow ’12-’16), University of California, Berkeley
Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF45 Mediates Transcriptional Activation of the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat via RSK2.
Karijolich J, Zhao Y, Peterson B, Zhou Q, Glaunsinger B. J Virol. 2014 Jun 15;88(12):7024-7035. Epub 2014 Apr 9.

William Y. Kim, MD (Clinical Investigator ’09-’14), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
mTOR Inhibition Induces Compensatory, Therapeutically Targetable MEK Activation in Renal Cell Carcinoma. Bailey ST, Zhou B, Damrauer JS, Krishnan B, Wilson HL, Smith AM, Li M, Yeh JJ, Kim WY. PLoS One. 2014 Sep 2;9(9):e104413.

Serkan Kir, PhD (Fellow ’13-’16), Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
Tumour-derived PTH-related protein triggers adipose tissue browning and cancer cachexia.
Kir S, White JP, Kleiner S, Kazak L, Cohen P, Baracos VE, Spiegelman BM. Nature. 2014 Sep 4;513(7516):100-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13528.

Moritz F. Kircher, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’14-’16), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York
Guiding Brain Tumor Resection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles and a Hand-Held Raman Scanner.
Karabeber H, Huang R, Iacono P, Samii JM, Pitter K, Holland EC, Kircher MF. ACS Nano. 2014 Aug 22.

Kristin A. Krukenberg, PhD (Fellow ’10-’13), Harvard Medical School, Boston
Basal Activity of a PARP1-NuA4 Complex Varies Dramatically across Cancer Cell Lines. Krukenberg KA, Jiang R, Steen JA, Mitchison TJ. Cell Rep. 2014 Sep 25;8(6):1808-18. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.08.009.

David Q. Matus, PhD (Fellow ’07-’10), Stony Brook University, Stony Brook
Cell division and targeted cell cycle arrest opens and stabilizes basement membrane gaps.
Matus DQ, Chang E, Makohon-Moore SC, Hagedorn MA, Chi Q, Sherwood DR. Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 13;5:4184. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5184.

Nicholas E. Navin, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’13-’15), M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston
Clonal evolution in breast cancer revealed by single nucleus genome sequencing.
Wang Y, Waters J, Leung ML, Unruh A, Roh W, Shi X, Chen K, Scheet P, Vattathil S, Liang H, Multani A, Zhang H, Zhao R, Michor F, Meric-Bernstam F, Navin NE. Nature. 2014 Aug 14;512(7513):155-60. doi: 10.1038/nature13600.

Trudy G. Oliver, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’13-’15), University of Utah, Salt Lake City
Caspase-2 impacts lung tumorigenesis and chemotherapy response in vivo.
Terry MR, Arya R, Mukhopadhyay A, Berrett KC, Clair PM, Witt B, Salama ME, Bhutkar A, Oliver TG. Cell Death Differ. 2014 Oct 10. doi: 10.1038/cdd.2014.159.

Bradley L. Pentelute, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ’13-’15), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
Delivery of Antibody Mimics into Mammalian Cells via Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen. Liao X, Rabideau AE, Pentelute BL. Chembiochem. 2014 Sep 22. doi: 10.1002/cbic.201402290.

Alex Pollen, PhD (Fellow ’13-’17), University of California, San Francisco
Low-coverage single-cell mRNA sequencing reveals cellular heterogeneity and activated signaling pathways in developing cerebral cortex.
Pollen AA, Nowakowski TJ, Shuga J, Wang X, Leyrat AA, Lui JH, Li N, Szpankowski L, Fowler B, Chen P, Ramalingam N, Sun G, Thu M, Norris M, Lebofsky R, Toppani D, Kemp DW 2nd, Wong M, Clerkson B, Jones BN, Wu S, Knutsson L, Alvarado B, Wang J, Weaver LS, May AP, Jones RC, Unger MA, Kriegstein AR, West JA. Nat Biotechnol. 2014 Oct;32(10):1053-8. doi: 10.1038/nbt.2967.

Pardis C. Sabeti, MD, DPhil (Fellow ’04-’06), Harvard University, Cambridge
Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014 outbreak.
Gire SK, Goba A, Andersen KG, Sealfon RS, Park DJ, Kanneh L, Jalloh S, Momoh M, Fullah M, Dudas G, Wohl S, Moses LM, Yozwiak NL, Winnicki S, Matranga CB, Malboeuf CM, Qu J, Gladden AD, Schaffner SF, Yang X, Jiang PP, Nekoui M, Colubri A, Coomber MR, Fonnie M, Moigboi A, Gbakie M, Kamara FK, Tucker V, Konuwa E, Saffa S, Sellu J, Jalloh AA, Kovoma A, Koninga J, Mustapha I, Kargbo K, Foday M, Yillah M, Kanneh F, Robert W, Massally JL, Chapman SB, Bochicchio J, Murphy C, Nusbaum C, Young S, Birren BW, Grant DS, Scheiffelin JS, Lander ES, Happi C, Gevao SM, Gnirke A, Rambaut A, Garry RF, Khan SH, Sabeti PC. Science. 2014 Sep 12;345(6202):1369-72. doi: 10.1126/science.1259657.

Jens C. Schmidt, PhD (Fellow ’13-’17), University of Colorado, Boulder
Identification of human TERT elements necessary for telomerase recruitment to telomeres.
Jens C Schmidt, Andrew B Dalby, Thomas R Cech. eLife. 2014 Oct 1;0.7554/eLife.03563

Raffaella Sordella, PhD (Damon Runyon Rachleff Innovator ’10-’12), Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor
p53Ψ is a transcriptionally inactive p53 isoform able to reprogram cells toward a metastatic-like state.
Senturk S, Yao Z, Camiolo M, Stiles B, Rathod T, Walsh AM, Nemajerova A, Lazzara MJ, Altorki NK, Krainer A, Moll UM, Lowe SW, Cartegni L, Sordella R. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Aug 12;111(32):E3287-96. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1321640111.

Matthew Vander Heiden, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon Rachleff Innovator ’11-’13, Fellow ’06-’08), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
Elevation of circulating branched-chain amino acids is an early event in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma development.
Mayers JR, Wu C, Clish CB, Kraft P, Torrence ME, Fiske BP, Yuan C, Bao Y, Townsend MK, Tworoger SS, Davidson SM, Papagiannakopoulos T, Yang A, Dayton TL, Ogino S, Stampfer MJ, Giovannucci EL, Qian ZR, Rubinson DA, Ma J, Sesso HD, Gaziano JM, Cochrane BB, Liu S, Wactawski-Wende J, Manson JE, Pollak MN, Kimmelman AC, Souza A, Pierce K, Wang TJ, Gerszten RE, Fuchs CS, Vander Heiden MG, Wolpin BM. Nat Med. 2014 Oct;20(10):1193-8. doi: 10.1038/nm.3686.

Zefeng Wang, PhD (Fellow ’03-’06), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
The Splicing Factor RBM4 Controls Apoptosis, Proliferation, and Migration to Suppress Tumor Progression.
Wang Y, Chen D, Qian H, Tsai YS, Shao S, Liu Q, Dominguez D, Wang Z. Cancer Cell. 2014 Sep 8;26(3):374-89. doi: 10.1016/j.ccr.2014.07.010.

Kathryn E. Wellen, PhD (Fellow ’07-’10), University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
Akt-dependent metabolic reprogramming regulates tumor cell histone acetylation.
Lee JV, Carrer A, Shah S, Snyder NW, Wei S, Venneti S, Worth AJ, Yuan ZF, Lim HW, Liu S, Jackson E, Aiello NM, Haas NB, Rebbeck TR, Judkins A, Won KJ, Chodosh LA, Garcia BA, Stanger BZ, Feldman MD, Blair IA, Wellen KE. Cell Metab. 2014 Aug 5;20(2):306-19.

Ian Y. Wong, PhD (Fellow ’10-’13), Brown University, Providence
Collective and individual migration following the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.
Wong IY, Javaid S, Wong EA, Perk S, Haber DA, Toner M, Irimia D. Nat Mater. 2014 Aug 17. doi: 10.1038/nmat4062.

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October 20, 2014 > Institute of Medicine elects new members

Election to the Institute of Medicine is one of the highest honors that can be earned in the fields of medicine and health.  In recognition of their outstanding achievements, members of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation community were inducted this month:

Todd R. Golub, MD (Damon Runyon Board of Directors Member, Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award Committee Member), Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Cambridge
Guillermina (Gigi) Lozano, PhD (Former Fellowship Award Committee Member), The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston
David R. Piwnica-Worms, MD, PhD (Clinical Investigator Award Committee Member), The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston

Click here for more.

October 14, 2014 > 2014 NYSCF-Robertson Stem Cell Investigators named

Feng Zhang, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator '12-'14) of the Broad Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, is one of six promising early career scientists named as 2014 NYSCF-Robertson Stem Cell Investigators. The award is designed to support scientists engaged in novel neuroscience and cutting-edge translational stem cell research. Each Investigator will receive a generous five-year award.

Click here for more.

September 28, 2014 > Early sign of pancreatic cancer discovered

Matthew G. Vander Heiden, MD, PhD (Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator ‘11-‘13, Damon Runyon Fellow ‘06-‘08) of MIT, Cambridge, and colleagues, reported the discovery of a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an increase in certain amino acids due to changes in metabolism. This occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear, and the researchers hope that eventually they may be able to use this information to detect the disease earlier. These findings were published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Click here for more.

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