Nicholas C. DeVito, MD

Immunotherapy has resulted in positive outcomes for patients with melanoma, lung cancer, and other malignancies; however, most patients do not have meaningful responses to this treatment strategy. Tumors that fail to respond to immunotherapy have effectively hidden themselves from detection by the host immune system. Understanding how cancers create an immune-excluded environment promises to lead to the development of more highly effective immunotherapies.

Anthony D. Sung, MD

We share our bodies with trillions of microorganisms: the microbiota. The microbiota interacts with our bodies to affect health and disease, including cancer development and response to therapies. For example, in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as treatment for leukemias, lymphomas, and other blood cancers, disruptions in the microbiota have been linked to disease relapse, infections, treatment complications, and survival.

Lawrence A. David, PhD

We share our bodies with trillions of microorganisms: the microbiota. The microbiota interacts with our bodies to affect health and disease, including cancer development and response to therapies. For example, in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as treatment for leukemias, lymphomas, and other blood cancers, disruptions in the microbiota have been linked to disease relapse, infections, treatment complications, and survival.